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Photo: Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

A Snapchat spokesperson confirmed late Wednesday evening that the company locked President Trump's Snapchat account, making it the fourth major platform to take action on Trump's social media accounts.

Details: The company made the decision because it believes the account promotes and spreads hate and incites violence, the spokesperson said.

  • Snapchat's Community Guidelines prohibit hate speech, incitements or glorification of violence, the spread of misinformation that could cause harm, including conspiracy theories and efforts to undermine elections.
  • Accounts, including those from figures as prominent as the President will have offending content remove, not labeled, which is a stricter protocol than some of Snapchat's competitors.

What they're saying: "We can confirm that earlier today we locked President Trump's Snapchat account," Snap spokesperson Rachel Racusen told Axios.

The big picture: Twitter on Wednesday removed three of the president's tweets and locked his account for 12 hours, saying it may ban him if he doesn't stop breaking its rules with his false claims.

Flashback: Snapchat was one of the first major social platforms to take serious action on President Trump's account for threats to democracy in June when the company said it stopped promoting his account in its "Discover" section, which features professional content and content from prominent people.

  • That preemptive action meant that Trump’s account has not been visible to Snapchat users unless they chose to subscribe or search for him. 
  • Snapchat has been able to avoid most of the regulatory and industry pressure around misinformation, in part because it has stricter standards around the way it polices content.
  • "From the outset, we designed Snapchat differently than traditional social media -- to protect against the spread of misinformation and harmful viral content," a spokesperson said. "Our platform is built for communicating with close friends, we have long deliberately emphasized curated and moderated content, and we don’t allow unvetted content to be shared with a large audience."

Go deeper: Snapchat will no longer promote Trump's account in Discover

Go deeper

Updated Jan 21, 2021 - Technology

Facebook refers Trump ban to independent Oversight Board for review

Photo: Alex Edelman/AFP via Getty Images

Facebook's independent Oversight Board has accepted a referral from the platform to review its decision to indefinitely suspend former President Trump.

Why it matters: While Trump critics largely praised the company's decision to remove the then-president's account for potential incitement of violence, many world leaders and free speech advocates pushed back on the decision, arguing it sets a dangerous precedent for free speech moving forward.

20 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Biden's latest executive order: Buy American

President Joe R. Biden speaks about the economy before signing executive orders in the State Dining Room at the White House on Friday, Jan 22, 2021 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images)

President Joe Biden will continue his flurry of executive orders on Monday, signing a new directive to require the federal government to “buy American” for products and services.

Why it matters: The executive action is yet another attempt by Biden to accomplish goals administratively without waiting for the backing of Congress. The new order echoes Biden's $400 billion campaign pledge to increase government purchases of American goods.

Tech digs in for long domestic terror fight

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

With domestic extremist networks scrambling to regroup online, experts fear the next attack could come from a radicalized individual — much harder than coordinated mass events for law enforcement and platforms to detect or deter.

The big picture: Companies like Facebook and Twitter stepped up enforcement and their conversations with law enforcement ahead of Inauguration Day. But they'll be tested as the threat rises that impatient lone-wolf attackers will lash out.

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