Sign up for our daily briefing

Make your busy days simpler with Axios AM/PM. Catch up on what's new and why it matters in just 5 minutes.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Denver news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Denver

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Des Moines news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Des Moines

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Minneapolis-St. Paul news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Twin Cities

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Tampa Bay news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Tampa Bay

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Charlotte news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Charlotte

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Mark Zuckerberg. Photo: Anadolu Agency / Getty Images

Facebook on Wednesday banned President Trump from posting for 24 hours after finding two of his incendiary posts violated its policy. The move comes after CEO Mark Zuckerberg declared the situation in Washington, D.C., an "emergency" and said the company was considering "additional measures" to keep people safe, according to an internal memo obtained by Axios.

Why it matters: President Trump has been using social media, particularly Facebook and Twitter, to get out his message, which has included continued baseless claims of election fraud and praise for those who occupied the Capitol.

"We've assessed two policy violations against President Trump's page which will result in a 24-hour feature block, meaning he will lose the ability to post on the platform during that time," a spokesperson told Axios.

Catch up quick: Facebook removed at least two posts from Trump, including a video, while Twitter hid from view three posts and has locked Trump's account until he deletes the offending posts.

Where it stands: Facebook took to a blog post Wednesday to explain its approach to content related to the siege.

  • The company said it has been — and will continue — taking down videos and photos from those in the mob, as well as posts supporting the storming of the Capitol; calls to bring weapons to protests around the country; calls for protest that violate a curfew imposed in Washington, D.C.; and any attempts to foment further violence.

What they're saying: "We are treating this situation as an emergency, and we are implementing additional measures to keep people safe," Zuckerberg said.

  • Earlier on Wednesday, Facebook executives met to discuss how to handle Trump's account amid the escalating violence, sources told Axios.

Here is the text of Zuckerberg's internal post:

This is a dark moment in our nation's history, and I know many of you are frightened and concerned about what's happening in Washington, DC. I'm personally saddened by this mob violence -- which is exactly what this is. The peaceful transition of power is critical to the functioning of our democracy, and we need our political leaders to lead by example and put the nation first.
As Guy mentioned, our teams are actively monitoring the situation. We removed the recent video of President Trump's remarks expressing support for the people causing the violence. We are treating this situation as an emergency, and we are implementing additional measures to keep people safe.
Finally, I can confirm that every one of our DC-based employees is currently safe and accounted for. Our security team is continuing to track what's happening in our nation's capital and will provide further updates as necessary. If you have any questions in the meantime, please contact security@fb.com

Go deeper

20 hours ago - Technology

Review of Trump ban marks major turning point for Facebook

Photo Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios. Photo: Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

Facebook's decision to ask its new independent Oversight Board to review the company's indefinite suspension of former President Trump is likely to set a critical precedent for how the social media giant handles political speech from world leaders.

What they're saying: "I very much hope and can expect … that they will uphold our decision," Facebook's VP of global affairs Nick Clegg tells Axios.

Off the Rails

Episode 8: The siege

Photo illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios. Photos: Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

Beginning on election night 2020 and continuing through his final days in office, Donald Trump unraveled and dragged America with him, to the point that his followers sacked the U.S. Capitol with two weeks left in his term. Axios takes you inside the collapse of a president with a special series.

Episode 8: The siege. An inside account of the deadly insurrection at the Capitol on Jan. 6 that ultimately failed to block the certification of the Electoral College. And, finally, Trump's concession.

On Jan. 6, White House deputy national security adviser Matt Pottinger entered the West Wing in the mid-afternoon, shortly after his colleagues' phones had lit up with an emergency curfew alert from D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser.

Updated Jan 21, 2021 - Technology

Facebook refers Trump ban to independent Oversight Board for review

Photo: Alex Edelman/AFP via Getty Images

Facebook's independent Oversight Board has accepted a referral from the platform to review its decision to indefinitely suspend former President Trump.

Why it matters: While Trump critics largely praised the company's decision to remove the then-president's account for potential incitement of violence, many world leaders and free speech advocates pushed back on the decision, arguing it sets a dangerous precedent for free speech moving forward.