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Photo: Shannon Finney/Getty Images

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg announced Friday that she is in the midst of treating a recurrence of liver cancer, but said she remains "fully able" to fulfill her duties on the court.

The big picture: The 87-year-old has survived multiple bouts of cancer, amid a slew of health complications in recent years. Earlier this week, she was hospitalized due to an infection but was subsequently released.

  • Ginsburg said she began a course of chemotherapy in May after discovering the cancer in a scan in February.
  • She added that her most recent scan on July 7 "indicated significant reduction of the liver lesions and no new disease." She also said that she is "tolerating chemotherapy well" and will continue biweekly treatments.
  • She noted that her hospitalization earlier this week was not linked to her cancer.

The bottom line: "I have often said I would remain a member of the Court as long as I can do the job full steam. I remain fully able to do that," Ginsburg concluded.

Go deeper

How Amy Coney Barrett would change the way the Supreme Court works

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

Appointing three Supreme Court justices will likely be President Trump’s most important achievement, and Judge Amy Coney Barrett may well be the most important of the three.

Why it matters: Barrett would transform the court’s internal politics, handicapping Chief Justice John Roberts and establishing a new center of gravity on the right. Her presence would force a whole new set of strategic calculations among the justices — and those calculations will shape the law of the land for a generation.

Updated 9 hours ago - Politics & Policy

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Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

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  2. Politics: Biden unveils "wartime" COVID strategyBiden's COVID-19 bubble.
  3. Vaccine: Florida requiring proof of residency to get vaccine — CDC extends interval between vaccine doses for exceptional cases.
  4. World: Hong Kong to put tens of thousands on lockdown as cases surge.
  5. Sports: 2021 Tokyo Olympics hang in the balance.
  6. 🎧 Podcast: Carbon Health's CEO on unsticking the vaccine bottleneck.

Trump impeachment trial to start week of Feb. 8, Schumer says

Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer. Photo: The Washington Post via Getty

The Senate will begin former President Trump's impeachment trial the week of Feb. 8, Majority Leader Chuck Schumer announced Friday on the Senate floor.

The state of play: Schumer announced the schedule after reaching an agreement with Republicans. The House will transmit the article of impeachment against the former president late Monday.