Oct 19, 2019

Rick Perry will not cooperate with impeachment inquiry "at this time"

Rick Perry at the White House on June 12, 2019. Photo: Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images

The Department of Energy cited the same arguments as the Pentagon for why it is unable to cooperate "at this time" with House committees' subpoena for documents related to President Trump's efforts to push Ukraine to investigate Joe Biden.

The big picture: As Axios first reported, President Trump told House Republicans that he made his now infamous phone call to Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky — described in the whistleblower report at the center of an ongoing impeachment inquiry — at the urging of Energy Secretary Rick Perry, who informed Trump that he is resigning on Thursday.

What they're saying: The department's refusal to hand over documents is based largely on the executive privilege argument invoked by the White House over the unredacted Mueller report and the controversial Census citizenship question. The Energy Department also argues that the House has not yet held a full, formal vote to authorize an impeachment inquiry against Trump.

Read the Department of Energy's response to the House subpoena:

Go deeper: Energy Secretary Rick Perry offers Trump his resignation

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Trump says he'd love Ukraine's Zelensky to visit the White House

Presidents Zelensky and Trump during a meeting in New York on Sept. 25. Photo: Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

President Trump told reporters Saturday he "would love" to have Ukraine's leader visit the White House and he thinks "he’d like to come," Reuters reports.

Why it matters: His July 25 phone call with Ukrainian President Zelensky is at the center of a whistleblower complaint and subsequent impeachment inquiry into whether Trump withheld Ukraine's military aid to encourage an investigation into former vice president Joe Biden and his son Hunter Biden. Trump denies any "quid pro quo" took place.

Go deeper: Trump-Ukraine scandal: All the key players, dates and documents

House vs. Senate Republicans on impeachment

Trump enters "The Beast" in Alabama on Nov. 9. Photo: Reuters/Tom Brenner

Republicans are divided in their approach to defend President Trump in the impeachment inquiry, AP reports.

What's happening: Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has privately advised his colleagues to say as little about impeachment as possible. Last month, he held a meeting on the Senate's trial rules of procedure. Meanwhile, House Republicans have taken a bolder stance.

Go deeperArrowNov 9, 2019

All the people Trump says he doesn't know in the Ukraine investigation

Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

In a tweet Sunday, President Trump attacked Jennifer Williams, an aide to Vice President Mike Pence, for her testimony in a closed-door impeachment hearing, calling her a "Never Trumper" while also claiming he doesn't know who she is.

The big picture: Over the past few weeks, the president has continually claimed that he does not know several of the key people involved in the impeachment inquiry — despite them serving in his own administration.

Go deeperArrowUpdated Nov 17, 2019