Jun 11, 2019

DOJ threatens House Dems with executive privilege over Census documents

Attorney General Bill Barr. Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

The Department of Justice has informed the House Oversight Committee that it will advise President Trump to assert executive privilege over subpoenaed documents if the panel votes to hold Attorney General Bill Barr and Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross in contempt for refusing to turn over materials related to the Census citizenship question.

Context: Ross and Barr have declined to cooperate with subpoenas requesting documents about the Trump administration's addition of a citizenship question to the 2020 Census, which critics say could scare non-citizens into lying or refusing to fill out the survey. This could have major implications for federal funding and redistricting, prompting claims that the move was politically motivated.

  • The Supreme Court is expected to rule on whether the question is constitutional by the end of June.

Read the DOJ's letter:

Go deeper: Census could be worst undercount of black and Latinx people since 1990

Go deeper

Your guide to comparing climate change and coronavirus

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

Climate change and the coronavirus have a lot more in common than the letter C, but their differences explain society’s divergent responses to each.

Why it matters: The Internet is full of comparisons, some from biased perspectives. I'm going to try to cut through the noise to help discerning readers looking for objective information.

Updated 2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

George Floyd protests: Unrest continues for 6th night across U.S.

A protest near the White House on Sunday night. Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

Most external lights at the White House were turned off late Sunday as the D.C. National Guard was deployed and authorities fired tear gas at hundreds of protesters nearby, per the New York Times.

What's happening: It's one of several tense, late-night standoffs between law enforcement and demonstrators in the United States.

Updated 7 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Journalists get caught in the crosshairs as protests unfold

A man waves a Black Lives Matter flag atop the CNN logo outside the CNN Center during a protest in response to the police killing of George Floyd, Atlanta, Georgia, May 29. Photo: Elijah Nouvelage/Getty Images

Dozens of journalists across the country tweeted videos Saturday night of themselves and their crews getting arrested, being shot at by police with rubber bullets, targeted with tear gas by authorities or assaulted by protesters.

Driving the news: The violence got so bad over the weekend that on Sunday the Cleveland police said the media was not allowed downtown unless "they are inside their place of business" — drawing ire from news outlets around the country, who argued that such access is a critical part of adequately covering protests.