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A screenshot of Russian opposition leader Alexey Navalny on CBS' "60 Minutes." Photo: CBS/"60 Minutes"

Russian opposition leader Alexey Navalny called on President Trump during an interview with CBS' "60 Minutes" broadcast Sunday to condemn his Novichok poisoning that left him critically ill in hospital.

Details: Asked by CBS' Lesley Stahl if it's important for Trump to condemn the attack, which Navalny says Russian President Putin was behind, he replied: "I think it's extremely important that everyone, of course, including and maybe in the first of all, president of United States, to be very against using chemical weapons in the 21st Century."

  • Stahl also noted that German Chancellor Angela Merkle and French President Emmanuel Macron had "persuaded the European Union to impose sanctions" against Russia — which has denied any involvement in the attack — and that "all these leaders have signed on, except Donald Trump" to the plan.
  • Navalny, who is recuperating in Berlin, Germany, replied, "Yes, I ... have noticed it."

Of note: While the White House did not immediately respond to Axios' request for comment, Trump last month denied there was any proof that Russia poisoned Navalny, adding he would be "very angry if that is the case."

  • Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said last month "there is a substantial chance" the order to poison Navalny came from senior Russian officials.
  • The U.S. also joined G7 foreign ministers in condemning Navalny's poisoning, calling it "another grave blow against democracy and political plurality in Russia" and urging the country to "fully establish transparency on who is responsible."

Editor’s note: This article has been updated with further context on the U.S. and the G7's position condemning Navalny’s poisoning.

Go deeper

Oct 26, 2020 - Politics & Policy

Key takeaways from the "60 Minutes" interviews with Trump and Biden

Combination image of President Trump and Democratic Presidential candidate former Vice President Joe Biden during the first presidential debate in Cleveland, Ohio on Sept. 29. Photo: Jim Watson, Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

CBS' "60 Minutes" aired its interviews with President Trump and Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden Sunday evening, as the 2020 election rivals offered starkly different visions for the U.S.

The big picture: The show opened with Trump's interview with CBS' Lesley Stahl — which she noted "began politely, but ended regrettably, contentiously" after the president abruptly ended it, before moving on to Vice President Mike Pence, and then Biden and running mate Sen. Kamala Harris.

Biden plans to ask public to wear masks for first 100 days in office

Joe Biden. Photo: Mark Makela/Gettu Images

President-elect Joe Biden told CNN on Thursday that he plans to ask the American public to wear face masks for the first 100 days of his presidency.

The big picture: Biden also stated he has asked NIAID director Anthony Fauci to stay on in his current role, serve as a chief medical adviser and be part of his COVID-19 response team when he takes office early next year.

What COVID-19 vaccine trials still need to do

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

COVID-19 vaccines are being developed at record speed, but some experts fear the accelerated regulatory process could interfere with ongoing research about the vaccines.

Why it matters: Even after the first COVID-19 vaccines are deployed, scientific questions will remain about how they are working and how to improve them.