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Photo: Patrick Smith/Getty Images

The NCAA's Board of Governors announced Wednesday that it supports rule changes that would allow student-athletes to receive compensation for their names, images and likenesses.

Yes, but: Don't expect a free market for student-athletes just yet. While the NCAA cleared the way to support third-party endorsements and other money-making opportunities, like social-media influencing and personal appearances, its announcement still leaves a number of questions moving forward.

  • The NCAA wants to ask Congress to back a federal law that would preempt piecemeal action by states on the issue — and codify that student-athletes aren't university employees.
  • It said that it does not want student-athletes' name, image or likeness to be used to support schools' recruiting or their boosters, which is a provision that could ultimately be impossible to enforce.
  • It also believes there are "legal hurdles" that would prevent student-athletes from making money on licensing for "group products" like video games.

The big picture: California Gov. Gavin Newsom signed a bill into law last September that allowed the state's college athletes to accept endorsement deals by 2023, upending the decades-long precedent set by the NCAA.

What's next: The Board of Governors' recommendations will be submitted to the NCAA's three divisions, which will likely adopt the suggested changes moving into the 2021-2022 academic year.

Go deeper

Kendall Baker, author of Sports
Aug 5, 2020 - Sports

The return of high school sports hangs in the balance

Data: MaxPreps, Axios research; Cartogram: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

As local governments go to war over whether high schools can open, the fate of the fall sports season hangs in the balance.

The state of play: The National Federation of State High School Associations has offered a 16-page guide to help states resume athletics, but with so many organizations and school districts involved, there has been little uniformity.

Scoop: Biden weighs retired general Lloyd Austin for Pentagon chief

Lloyd Austin testifying before Congress in 2015. Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Joe Biden is considering retired four-star general Lloyd Austin as his nominee for Defense secretary, adding him to a shortlist that includes Jeh Johnson, Tammy Duckworth and Michele Flournoy, two sources with direct knowledge of the decision-making tell Axios.

Why it matters: A nominee for Pentagon chief was noticeably absent when the president-elect rolled out his national security team Tuesday. Flournoy had been widely seen as the likely pick, but Axios is told other factors — race, experience, Biden's comfort level — have come into play.

Updated 32 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Health: WHO: AstraZeneca vaccine must be evaluated on "more than a press release."
  2. Politics: Supreme Court backs religious groups on New York COVID restrictions.
  3. World: Thailand, Philippines sign deal with AstraZeneca for vaccine.
  4. Economy: Safety nets to disappear in December Black Friday shopping across the U.S., in photosAmazon hires 1,400 workers a day throughout pandemic.
  5. Education: National standardized tests delayed until 2022.