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The University of California Golden Bears would be affected by this law. Photo: Thearon W. Henderson/Getty Images

California Gov. Gavin Newsom signed a bill into law Monday that allows the state's college athletes to accept endorsement deals based on their player brand starting in 2023.

Why it matters: The law, which the NCAA has fervently argued against, rocks the decades-long precedent set by the organization to prevent collegiate athletes from being paid. If the law survives any challenges in court, it will change the business of college sports as we know it.

  • The New York Times reports that student athletes in California could have to leave the NCAA or openly defy its rules, leading to fines.

What they're saying: The NCAA urged to the governor not to sign it weeks ago, arguing the "Fair Pay" bill was "unconstitutional."

  • The NCAA said in a statement Monday that it "will consider next steps in California while our members move forward with ongoing efforts to make adjustments to NCAA name, image and likeness rules that are both realistic in modern society and tied to higher education."
  • NBA player LeBron James tweeted: "I’'m so incredibly proud to share this moment with all of you. @gavinnewsom came to The Shop to do something that will change the lives for countless athletes who deserve it! @uninterrupted hosted the formal signing for SB 206 allowing college athletes to responsibly get paid."
  • California Sen. Kamala Harris tweeted: "Thank you @GavinNewsom for his leadership on this issue and @Ed_OBannon for his long-fought advocacy. Again, California is leading the way. College athletes should own the rights to their name, image, and likeness."

Go deeper

DHS temporarily suspends use of horse patrol in Del Rio

U.S. Border Patrol agents watch as Haitian immigrant families cross the Rio Grande from Mexico into Del Rio, Texas on Sept. 23, 2021. Photo: John Moore/Getty Images

The Department of Homeland Security on Thursday temporarily suspended the use of horse patrol in Del Rio, Texas a DHS spokesperson confirmed.

Why it matters: The suspension comes after images showing border patrol agents whipping at and charging their horses at migrants surfaced earlier in the week, prompting widespread criticism of the Biden administration's handling of the crisis at the border.

Southwest drought is worst on record, NOAA finds

In a stark new report, a team of NOAA and independent researchers found the 2020-2021 drought across the Southwest is the worst in the instrumental record, which dates to 1895.

Why it matters: They also concluded that global warming is making it far more severe, primarily by increasing average temperatures, which boosts evaporation.

2 hours ago - World

Taliban: Executions and strict punishments will return

Taliban fighters in Kabul. Photo: Oliver Weiken/picture alliance via Getty Images

Strict punishments such as hand amputations and executions will return in Afghanistan, one of the Taliban's founders said in an interview with the Associated Press.

Why it matters: Despite attempting to project a new image, the Taliban remain committed to a hard-line, conservative ideology, including harsh ruling tactics.