Mar 12, 2020 - Sports

Mark Cuban vows to help hourly workers impacted by NBA coronavirus move

Mark Cuban at the SiriusXM Studios in New York City in February. Photo: Roy Rochlin/Getty Images

Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban told ESPN Wednesday that his team would "put together a program" for hourly workers who'd lose work after the NBA suspended the season following a Utah Jazz player testing positive for the novel coronavirus.

Why it matters: Cuban's remarks during his team's game against the Denver Nuggets come as momentum builds to compensate hourly workers impacted by the virus. Tech giants have led the charge, with Microsoft, Google, Facebook and Twitter pledging to pay hourly workers including cooks and cleaners regular wages. Cuban said at a news conference later he's more worried about his family than the NBA games suspension.

Go deeper: Tech giants promise to pay hourly workers while employees telecommute

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NBA suspends season after player tests positive for coronavirus

A coronavirus information poster outside a restroom at the American Airlines Arena on Wednesday in Miami. Photo: Michael Reaves/Getty Images

The NBA suspended all games Wednesday evening until further notice in response to the novel coronavirus outbreak after a Utah Jazz player returned a positive result for the virus in a preliminary test.

Why it matters: It's the latest in a wave of event cancellations as organizations seek to limit large gatherings over the global pandemic.

Go deeperArrowUpdated Mar 12, 2020 - Health

Mark Cuban opens door to 2020 run

Photo: Axios Events

Businessman and Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban revived talk of an improbable 2020 presidential bid during an Axios virtual event on Friday.

  • "Everything's a reset right now," Cuban told Axios CEO Jim VandeHei from Dallas. "If this would would've been a month ago, I would have said absolutely not. But obviously things are crazy, things are changing. So I'll keep an open mind. But I seriously doubt it."

Not all tech employees can work from home

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The remote work plan many companies are launching in response to concerns about the spread of the coronavirus doesn't work for everyone — even in the tech industry, and even for people whose jobs involve sitting in front of a screen all day.

Why it matters: While remote work can be an important tool for helping slow the spread of the disease, it's not a panacea.