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A protester holds up a sign calling for the release of detained Myanmar civilian leader Aung San Suu Kyi during a demonstration against the military coup in Yangon Feb. 7. All photos: Ye Aung Thu/AFP via Getty Images

Tens of thousands of protesters on Sunday rallied in cities across Myanmar for a second day of anti-coup demonstrations despite an internet shutdown, per Reuters.

The big picture: Myanmar's army declared a one-year state of emergency after seizing power and detaining leader Aung San Suu Kyi last Monday. Monitoring group NetBlocks Internet Observatory said a nationwide internet blackout that began Saturday was continuing.

A tweet previously embedded here has been deleted or was tweeted from an account that has been suspended or deleted.
A protester hands a rose to a Yangon police officer at a barricade Feb. 7. Reuters reports that many people demonstrators hit pots and drums "even as power cuts affected many districts of the city."
Protesters march in Yangon Feb. 7. While Suu Kyi's international standing has been damaged by her defending the military's brutal crackdown on Myanmar's Rohingya Muslims, she remains popular in the country.
Yangon riot police block a street Feb. 7. Two water cannon trucks have been parked near Yangon University, where many have been rallying, as riot police blocked a university entrance, AP notes.
Protesters hold placards and flowers during the Yangon demonstration on Feb. 7.
Protesters hold up the three finger salute and placards on Feb. 7.
Protesters march through the streets of Yangon Feb. 7. Photo: Ye Aung/AFP via Getty Images

Go deeper: Aung San Suu Kyi charged after Myanmar coup

Go deeper

Feb 6, 2021 - World

Myanmar military broadens internet crackdown as anti-coup protests grow

Protesters take to the street against the military coup in Myanmar. Photo: Photo by Getty Images/Getty Images

Myanmar's military appeared to have broadened its crackdown on internet access Saturday amid protests over the coup that ousted Aung San Suu Kyi’s elected civilian government, AP reports.

What's happening: Netblocks, a U.K.-based site that tracks internet disruptions worldwide, tweeted Saturday that “a near-total internet shutdown is now in effect” in Myanmar. The broad outages followed the military's order to block Facebook, Instagram and Twitter earlier this week.

Cuomo says words may have been "misinterpreted" following allegations of harassment

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo at a Feb. 22 news conference. Photo: Seth Wenig/pool/AF via Getty Images

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo issued a lengthy statement on Sunday saying he " never inappropriately touched anybody" but acknowledged that "some of the things I have said have been misinterpreted as an unwanted flirtation," after two of his former aides accused him of sexual harassment.

Why it matters: Prior to Cuomo's statement, in which he adds that he "never inappropriately touched anybody" or meant to make anyone uncomfortable, the governor's office and the state attorney general went back and forth in a public disagreement about how to investigate the allegations.

Cyber CEO: Next war will hit regular Americans online

Any future real-world conflict between the United States and an adversary like China or Russia will have direct impacts on regular Americans because of the risk of cyber attack, Kevin Mandia, CEO of cybersecurity company FireEye, tells "Axios on HBO."

What they're saying: "The next conflict where the gloves come off in cyber, the American citizen will be dragged into it, whether they want to be or not. Period."