Romney and Sen. Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.) at Trump's State of the Union address on Feb. 4. Photo: Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

After Sen. Mitt Romney (R-Utah) voted to convict President Trump for abuse of power in the impeachment trial Wednesday, Republicans doubled down to rebuke the senator while Democrats rushed to his defense.

What he's saying: "I am aware that there are people in my party and in my state who will strenuously disapprove of my decision, and in some quarters, I will be vehemently denounced," Romney said on the Senate floor Wednesday. "I am sure to hear abuse from the President and his supporters."

  • Romney was already shunned from the CPAC 2020 conference for voting in favor of bringing additional evidence and witness testimony to Trump's impeachment trial.
What Republicans are saying:
  • President Trump tweeted early Thursday, "Had failed presidential candidate @MittRomney devoted the same energy and anger to defeating a faltering Barack Obama as he sanctimoniously does to me, he could have won the election. Read the Transcripts!"
  • Earlier Wednesday, the president tweeted a video that falsely accused Romney of being a "Democrat secret asset" who aimed to "infiltrate Trump's administration as Secretary of State." (Trump first tweeted the video in October.)
  • GOP Chairwoman Ronna McDaniel — Romney's niece — said Wednesday, "This is not the first time I have disagreed with Mitt, and I imagine it will not be the last. The bottom line is President Trump did nothing wrong, and the Republican Party is more united than ever behind him,"
  • Donald Trump Jr. tweeted Wednesday, "Mitt Romney is forever bitter that he will never be POTUS. He was too weak to beat the Democrats then so he’s joining them now. He’s now officially a member of the resistance & should be expelled from the @GOP."
  • "The Utah Republican Party is pleased to see President Trump completely acquitted by the United States Senate. We appreciate the service rendered to our state by Utah’s two senators. As a party, we strongly disagree with the vote cast today by Senator Romney."
  • House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.) tweeted Wednesday, "The Republican party is unified and President Trump will be acquitted. Mitt's flat wrong on this, and he doesn’t represent the views of any Republican in Congress."
  • White House press secretary Stephanie Grisham said Wednesday, "The Senate voted to reject the baseless articles of impeachment, and only the President’s political opponents — all Democrats, and one failed Republican presidential candidate — voted for the manufactured impeachment articles."
  • Former Arizona Sen. Jeff Flake tweeted, "I have long admired Mitt Romney, but never more than today. What an honorable man."
What Democrats are saying:
  • Rep. Adam Schiff (D-Calif.) said it was "stirring" to hear Romney's words on the Senate floor and praised his courage to "speak truth to power" in an interview with MSNBC's Rachel Maddow Wednesday.
  • Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y.) retweeted MSNBC's Chris Hayes comment: "Romney will become the first US Senator in American history to vote to remove a president of his own party."
  • Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) tweeted Wednesday "Corrupting an election to keep oneself in office is perhaps the most abusive and destructive violation of one's oath of office that I can imagine." I agree, @MittRomney. Voting to convict this president is an act of patriotism. Thank you for yours."
  • Sen. Chris Murphy (D-Conn.) tweeted Wednesday"I sat silently across the chamber, listening to my friend give one of the most important speeches I have ever had the good fortune to hear in person. At a time when many wonder what honor is left in public life, there stands Mitt Romney."
  • Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-N.Y.) tweeted Wednesday, "Thank you @MittRomney for rising to this moment, for choosing to vote your conscience, and for doing what you know in your heart to be right."
  • 2020 candidate Andrew Yang said at a CNN town hall Wednesday, "I just want to congratulate Sen. Mitt Romney for voting his conscience and character."

Go deeper: Mitt Romney says he will vote to convict Trump in impeachment trial

Editor's note: This article has been updated with Trump's comments.

Go deeper

Trump signs bill to prevent government shutdown

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnel and President Trump arrives at the U.S. Capitol in March. Photo: Samuel Corum/Getty Images

President Trump signed a bill to extend current levels of government funding after funding expired briefly, White House spokesperson Judd Deere confirmed early Thursday.

Why it matters: The move averts a government shutdown before the Nov. 3 election. The Senate on Wednesday passed the legislation to fund the federal government through Dec. 11, by a vote of 84-10.

Of note: While the previous measure lapse before Trump signed the bill, the Office of Management and Budget had instructed federal agencies "to not engage in orderly shutdown activities," a senior administration official told the New York Times, because of the OMB was confident the president would sign the measure on Thursday.

Editor's note: This is a developing news story. Please check back for updates.

Updated 37 mins ago - Science

In photos: Deadly wildfires devastate California's wine country

The Shady Fire ravages a home as it approaches Santa Rosa in Napa County, California, on Sept. 28. The blaze is part of the massive Glass Fire Complex, which has razed over 51,620 acres at 2% containment. Photo: Samuel Corum/Agence France-Presse/AFP via Getty Images

More than 1700 firefighters are battling 26 major blazes across California, including in the heart of the wine country, where one mega-blaze claimed the lives of three people and forced thousands of others to evacuate this week.

The big picture: More than 8,100 wildfires have burned across a record 39 million-plus acres, killing 29 people and razing almost 7,900 structures in California this year, per Cal Fire. Just like the deadly blazes of 2017, the wine country has become a wildfires epicenter. Gov. Gavin Newsom has declared a state of emergency in Napa, Sonoma, and Shasta counties.

Updated 1 hour ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 12:30 a.m. ET: 33,880,896 — Total deaths: 1,012,964 — Total recoveries: 23,551,663Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 12:30 a.m. ET: 7,232,823 — Total deaths: 206,887 — Total recoveries: 2,840,688 — Total tests: 103,939,667Map.
  3. Education: School-aged children now make up 10% of all U.S COVID-19 cases.
  4. Health: Moderna says its coronavirus vaccine won't be ready until 2021
  5. Travel: CDC: 3,689 COVID-19 or coronavirus-like cases found on cruise ships in U.S. waters — Airlines begin mass layoffs while clinging to hope for federal aid
  6. Business: Real-time data show economy's rebound slowing but still going.
  7. Sports: Steelers-Titans NFL game delayed after coronavirus outbreak.