Feb 6, 2020 - Politics & Policy

Schiff: Bolton refused to give sworn statement on Ukraine to House Democrats

Bolton addresses reporters in the White House. Photo: Liu Jie/Xinhua via Getty Images

Former national security adviser John Bolton "refused" to submit a sworn affidavit "describing what he observed in terms of the president's Ukraine misconduct" to House Democrats after the Senate voted not to hear witnesses in President Trump's impeachment trial, Rep. Adam Schiff (D-Calif.) told MSNBC on Wednesday.

Driving the news: Nadler said Wednesday it is "likely" House Democrats will subpoena Bolton and continue investigations into Trump's hold on military aid to Ukraine. Schiff told "The Rachel Maddow Show" that no decision had been made to subpoena Bolton.

What he's saying: ""For whatever reason, [Bolton] apparently was willing to testify before the Senate, but apart from that, seems intent on saving it for his book," Schiff told host Rachel Maddow. "He'll have to answer for that, but at this point we have not made a decision about whether or not to move forward with a subpoena, but it is certainly something that we will be discussing."

Flashback: Bolton said Monday that he would testify in Trump's impeachment trial should the Senate issue a subpoena.

The big picture: The Senate acquitted Trump of abuse of power and obstruction of Congress on Wednesday, with nearly every Republican declining to pursue new information about Trump's Ukraine activities.

Go deeper: Nadler says House Democrats will "likely" subpoena Bolton

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Nadler says House Democrats will "likely" subpoena Bolton

Former national security adviser John Bolton. Photo: Win McNamee/Getty Images

House Judiciary Chairman Jerry Nadler (D-N.Y.) said Wednesday that it is "likely" House Democrats will subpoena former national security adviser John Bolton and continue investigations into President Trump's hold on military aid to Ukraine, according to CNN's Manu Raju.

The state of play: Trump is set to be acquitted on articles of impeachment centered on the Ukraine saga, and Republican senators voted last week against calling new witnesses, including Bolton, in the impeachment trial.

Republicans fear "floodgates" if Bolton testifies

Photo: Yuri Oreshkin/TASS via Getty Images

There may be enough new pressure on Senate Republicans to allow witnesses at President Trump's impeachment trial, after the leak from a forthcoming book by former national security adviser John Bolton that contradicts what the White House has been telling the country.

Why it matters: This is a dramatic, 11th-hour inflection point for the trial, with an eyewitness rebuttal to Trump's claim that he never tied the hold-up of Ukrainian aid to investigations into Joe Biden.

Go deeperArrowJan 27, 2020

Romney: It's "increasingly likely" Senate Republicans will vote for Bolton testimony

Sen. Mitt Romney (R-Utah) said Monday that it is "increasingly likely" that he and at least three other Senate Republicans will vote to call former national security adviser John Bolton as a witness in President Trump's impeachment trial.

Why it matters: His comments come after the New York Times reported that Bolton alleges in his forthcoming book that Trump told him he needed aid withheld from Ukraine until it helped with investigations into Democrats, including the Bidens.

Go deeperArrowJan 27, 2020