Photo: Ashley Landis-Pool/Getty Images

In a statement addressing their decision to boycott their NBA playoff game on Wednesday evening, the Milwaukee Bucks called on the police officers involved in the shooting of Jacob Blake to be held accountable and for the Wisconsin State Legislature to reconvene to pass "meaningful" reform.

Why it matters: The Bucks' historic decision to sit out a playoff game in protest of Blake's shooting in Kenosha prompted the NBA to postpone all games scheduled for Wednesday night, sending reverberations throughout the sports world.

Full statement:

The past four months have shed a light on the ongoing racial injustices facing our African American communities. Citizens around the country have used their voices and platforms to speak out against these wrongdoings.
Over the last few days in our home state of Wisconsin, we’ve seen the horrendous video of Jacob Blake being shot in the back seven times by a police officer in Kenosha, and the additional shooting of protestors. Despite the overwhelming plea for change, there has been no action, so our focus today cannot be on basketball.
When we take the court and represent Milwaukee and Wisconsin, we are expected to play at a high level, give maximum effort and hold each other accountable. We hold ourselves to that standard, and in this moment, we are demanding the same from our lawmakers and law enforcement.
We are calling for justice for Jacob Blake and demand the officers be held accountable. For this to occur, it is imperative for the Wisconsin State Legislature to reconvene after months of inaction and take up meaningful measures to address issues of police accountability, brutality and criminal justice reform. We encourage all citizens to educate themselves take peaceful and responsible action, and remember to vote on Nov. 3.

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