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Trump supporters at a "Stop the Steal" rally at the Michigan Capitol in November. Photo: Jeff Kowalsky.

Rhetoric by President Trump and his allies seeking to undermine the integrity of the election is fueling potential violence against public servants, with fears running especially high as the Electoral College meets Monday to further cement Joe Biden's victory.

Driving the news: As Michigan electors meet on Monday to hand Biden his 16 electoral votes, state Senate and House offices will be closed due to “credible threats of violence,” according to Senate Majority Leader Mike Shirkey (R).

  • GOP State Rep. Gary Eisen was removed from his committee assignments after declining to rule out violence in a radio interview in which he discussed an unspecified effort to disrupt Michigan's Electoral College vote.
  • "No. I don’t know," Eisen said when asked on WPHM if he could ensure people wouldn't get hurt. "Because what we’re doing today is uncharted. It hasn’t been done. And it’s not me who’s doing it. ... It’s the Michigan Republican Party."

The big picture: Public officials in multiple states have reported receiving death threats over the election, as Trump continues to baselessly claim that the election was "rigged."

  • An "enemies list" containing home addresses of officials that rejected Trump's election conspiracy theories popped up in dark corners of the internet last week, with users accusing them of a treasonous plot to overthrow the president, WashPost reports.
  • Social media hashtags like #remembertheirfaces and #NoQuarterForTraitors were promoted alongside the names on the list.
  • At least four people were stabbed over the weekend in Washington, D.C., as violent clashes broke out after Trump supporters protesting the election descended on the nation's capital.

The state of play: Michigan's electors will receive a police escort as they walk from their cars to the Capitol Monday, per the New York Times.

  • Stop the Steal, a group which believes baseless claims the election was stolen from President Trump, has said on social media they will protest the vote.

Go deeper: Electoral College steps up safety preparations amid pandemic, potential violence

Go deeper

Jan 26, 2021 - Politics & Policy

Biden on Trump's impeachment trial: "I think it has to happen"

President Biden told CNN Monday that he believes the impeachment trial of former President Trump "has to happen," but he does not think 17 Republicans will join Democrats to vote to convict.

Why it matters: Biden's comments are most concrete he has made about his views on Trump's second impeachment.

Kaine, Collins' censure resolution seeks to bar Trump from holding office again

Sen. Tim Kaine (center) and Sen. Susan Collins (right). Photo: Andrew Harnik/Pool via Getty Images

Sens. Tim Kaine (D-Va.) and Susan Collins (R-Maine) are forging ahead with a draft proposal to censure former President Trump, and are considering introducing the resolution on the Senate floor next week.

Why it matters: Senators are looking for a way to condemn Trump on the record as it becomes increasingly unlikely Democrats will obtain the 17 Republican votes needed to gain a conviction, Axios Alayna Treene writes. "I think it’s important for the Senate's leadership to understand that there are alternatives," Kaine told CNN on Wednesday.

Stark reminder for America's corporate leaders

Rosalind "Roz" Brewer is about to become only the second Black woman to permanently lead a Fortune 500 company. She starts as Walgreens CEO on March 15.

Why it matters: It's a stark reminder of how far corporate America's top decision-makers have to go during an unprecedented push by politicians, employees and even a stock exchange to diversify their top ranks.