Michael Bloomberg. Photo: Michael Ciaglo/Getty Images.

Michael Bloomberg's annual physical exam found that he is in "outstanding health," according to a letter from Bloomberg's doctor released by his campaign Thursday.

Why it matters: Bloomberg, 77, is the second-oldest contender for the Democratic nomination behind the 78-year-old Sen. Bernie Sanders, who suffered a heart attack in October. Age and mental acuity have risen to the forefront of campaign issues in a race dominated by septuagenarians.

Details: Bloomberg underwent a coronary stent placement for a blocked artery in 2000, and his doctor reports that he has undergone routine cardiac stress testing since then.

  • In 2018, Bloomberg developed atrial fibrillation — a form of irregular heartbeat — for which he now takes a blood thinner. Bloomberg also takes medicine to control his cholesterol, in addition to a beta-blocker.
  • Bloomberg's doctors says he has also had "small skin cancers removed, and is treated for arthritis and heartburn, both of which are well controlled."
  • The letter also notes that Bloomberg "exercises several times a week and plays golf avidly."

Read the letter.

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Updated 18 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 7 a.m. ET: 32,870,631 — Total deaths: 994,534 — Total recoveries: 22,749,163Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 7 a.m. ET: 7,079,689 — Total deaths: 204,499 — Total recoveries: 2,750,459 — Total tests: 100,492,536Map.
  3. States: New York daily cases top 1,000 for first time since June — U.S. reports over 55,000 new coronavirus cases.
  4. Health: The long-term pain of the mental health pandemicFewer than 10% of Americans have coronavirus antibodies.
  5. Business: Millions start new businesses in time of coronavirus.
  6. Education: Summer college enrollment offers a glimpse of COVID-19's effect.

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Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The Supreme Court isn't just one of the most pressing issues in the presidential race — the justices may also have to decide parts of the election itself.

Why it matters: Important election-related lawsuits are already making their way to the court. And close results in swing states, with disputes over absentee ballots, set up the potential for another Bush v. Gore scenario, election experts say.

Graham hopes his panel will approve Amy Coney Barrett by late October

Sen. Lindsey Graham during a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on Sept. 24, 2020 in Washington, DC. Photo: Win McNamee/Getty Images

Senate Judiciary Committee Chair Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) told Fox News Saturday he expects confirmation hearings on Judge Amy Coney Barrett's nomination to the Supreme Court to start Oct. 12 and for his panel to approve her by Oct. 26.

Why it matters: That would mean the final confirmation vote could take place on the Senate floor before the Nov. 3 presidential election.