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Photo: Oliver Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

White House chief of staff Mark Meadows hosted his daughter's 70-person indoor wedding in Atlanta in May, despite major coronavirus lockdowns and local ordinances blocking large gatherings, the Atlanta Journal-Constitution first reported on Thursday.

Why it matters: Spring saw waves of Americans canceling major life events, including weddings and graduations. Meadows circumventing lockdown rules is sure to strike a chord with those who obeyed authorities and missed out.

  • Rep. Jim Jordan (R-Ohio) was in attendance.
  • No one was wearing masks.
  • An order by Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp (R) at the time blocked gatherings of more than 10 people.

The big picture: The news also comes amid the White House's own coronavirus outbreak, which has included positive tests for President Trump and first lady Melania Trump.

  • Accountability watchdogs have turned to Meadows for answers. Under his leadership of staff, the virus has spread significantly throughout Trump's circle, reaching over a dozen people and hindering Trump's re-election activities.

Go deeper

Dec 15, 2020 - Politics & Policy

Scoop: McConnell alerted White House before congratulating Biden

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell walks with White House chief of staff Mark Meadows. Photo: Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call via Getty Images

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell called White House chief of staff Mark Meadows Tuesday morning to say he planned on congratulating Joe Biden on winning the Electoral College and would officially address him as president-elect on the Senate floor, two sources familiar with the call tell Axios.

Why it matters: The Senate leader had resisted public demands to acknowledge Biden's victory despite the president's losing court battles, holding off until electors had formally given Biden the 270 votes he needed to secure his win on Monday. The delay underscored that McConnell still needs President Trump to back must-pass legislation before leaving office, one of the sources said.

Republicans pledge to set aside differences and work with Biden

President Biden speaks to Sen. Mitch McConnell after being sworn in at the West Front of the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday. Photo: Erin Schaff-Pool/Getty Images

Several Republicans praised President Biden's calls for unity during his inaugural address on Wednesday and pledged to work together for the benefit of the American people.

Why it matters: The Democrats only have a slim majority in the Senate and Biden will likely need to work with the GOP to pass his legislative agenda.

The Biden protection plan

Joe Biden announces his first run for the presidency in June 1987. Photo: Howard L. Sachs/CNP/Getty Images

The Joe Biden who became the 46th president on Wednesday isn't the same blabbermouth who failed in 1988 and 2008.

Why it matters: Biden now heeds guidance about staying on task with speeches and no longer worries a gaffe or two will cost him an election. His staff also limits the places where he speaks freely and off the cuff. This Biden protective bubble will only tighten in the months ahead, aides tell Axios.