Royal Caribbean's Mariner of the Seas. Photo: Paul Hennessy/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Major trade group Cruise Lines International Association announced on Friday its members are voluntarily suspending trips out of U.S. ports until Sept. 15.

Why it matters: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's no sail order was due to expire July 24. Cruising giants like Royal Caribbean, Carnival and Norwegian Cruise Line are members of the trade group.

What they're saying: “The current No Sail Order issued by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) will expire on 24 July, and although we had hoped that cruise activity could resume as soon as possible after that date, it is increasingly clear that more time will be needed to resolve barriers to resumption in the United States," Cruise Lines International Association said in a statement.

  • “Although we are confident that future cruises will be healthy and safe, and will fully reflect the latest protective measures, we also feel that it is appropriate to err on the side of caution to help ensure the best interests of our passengers and crewmembers."
  • "The additional time will also allow us to consult with the CDC on measures that will be appropriate for the eventual resumption of cruise operations."

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