Rep. Mac Thornberry. Photo: Michael Brochstein/SOPA Images/LightRocket/Getty Images

Rep. Mac Thornberry (R-Texas) announced Monday that he will not seek re-election in 2020, becoming the 6th Texas Republican — and 19th Republican overall — to retire from the House this term.

Why it matters: Republicans hope to reclaim the House in 2020, but early retirements could complicate that task. Thornberry's retirement means that more than a quarter of Texas' 23 House Republicans will leave at the end of this term, further complicating the party's status in a state that is becoming increasingly competitive for Democrats.

House GOP Texas seats now up for grabs in 2020:

  • Rep. Mike Conaway, 11th district
  • Rep. Mac Thornberry, 13th district
  • Rep. Bill Flores, 17th district
  • Rep. Pete Olson, 22nd district
  • Rep. Will Hurd, 23rd district
  • Rep. Kenny Marchant, 24th district

What they're saying: "With over a year to go, I will continue to represent the people of the 13th District to the best of my ability. Our nation faces many difficult challenges, and none of us can relax our efforts to meet and overcome them, whether at home or around the world," Thornberry, the ranking member of the House Armed Services Committee, said in a statement.

Of note: Thornberry overwhelmingly won re-election in 2018, earning more than 80% of his district's votes.

Go deeper: Shifting demographics could bring Texas into play for Democrats in 2020

Go deeper

Kendall Baker, author of Sports
3 mins ago - Sports

A look inside sports owners' political donations

Data: ESPN/FiveThirtyEight; Chart: Axios Visuals

Sports team owners in the four largest North American leagues (NFL, NBA, MLB, NHL) have donated over $46 million in federal elections since 2015, according to research conducted by ESPN and FiveThirtyEight.

By the numbers: Over the past three elections, $35.7 million of that money (77.4%) has gone to Republican campaigns and super PACs, compared to $10.4 million (22.6%) to Democrats.

Updated 1 hour ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Health: Large coronavirus outbreaks leading to high death rates — Coronavirus cases are at an all-time high ahead of Election Day — Fauci says U.S. may not return to normal until 2022
  2. Politics: Space Force's No. 2 general tests positive for coronavirus
  3. World: Taiwan reaches a record 200 days with no local coronavirus cases
  4. Europe faces "stronger and deadlier" wave France imposes lockdown Germany to close bars and restaurants for a month.
  5. Sports: Boston Marathon delayed MLB to investigate Dodgers player who joined celebration after positive COVID test.
Caitlin Owens, author of Vitals
1 hour ago - Health

Large coronavirus outbreaks leading to high death rates

Data: The COVID Tracking Project; Chart: Sara Wise/Axios

Many of the states where coronavirus cases have recently skyrocketed are also seeing the highest death rates in the nation, a painful reminder that wherever the virus goes, death eventually follows.

Between the lines: Deaths usually lag behind cases by a few weeks. Given America's record-high case counts, it's reasonable to expect that death rates across the country will continue to rise in tandem.