A vaping store in Los Angeles County. Photo: Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images

The Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors voted on Tuesday to ban the sale of flavored tobacco products, and urged California Gov. Gavin Newsom to enact a statewide vaping ban, per City News Service via L.A. Times.

The big picture: Local and state authorities are banning vaping products across the country as the Trump administration prepares a federal ban on most flavored e-cigarettes. There have been 16 vaping-related deaths so far, and at least 805 confirmed and probable cases of lung injury.

  • Per the City News Service, more than 100 Californians who vaped have been hospitalized for breathing troubles and lung damage, according to the state Department of Public Health. Two have died, including 1 in LA County.
  • The board's vote came as dozens of tobacco business owners and advocates protested last week, claiming vaping helps people quit smoking, according to City News Service.
  • California’s Department of Public Health also issued an advisory last week, recommending that people stop vaping until investigations are concluded.

What to watch: The new law will be effective in 30 days, but online sales won't be considered illegal and users will not be disciplined under the new ordinance.

Go deeper: The global anti-vaping tipping point

Go deeper

Updated 10 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 9:30 p.m. ET: 32,746,147 — Total deaths: 991,678 — Total recoveries: 22,588,064Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 9:30 p.m. ET: 7,007,450 — Total deaths: 204,486 — Total recoveries: 2,750,459 — Total tests: 100,492,536Map.
  3. States: New York daily cases top 1,000 for first time since June — U.S. reports over 55,000 new coronavirus cases.
  4. Health: The long-term pain of the mental health pandemicFewer than 10% of Americans have coronavirus antibodies.
  5. Business: Millions start new businesses in time of coronavirus.
  6. Education: Summer college enrollment offers a glimpse of COVID-19's effect.
Updated 4 hours ago - Politics & Policy

What they're saying: Trump nominates Amy Coney Barrett for Supreme Court

Judge Amy Coney Barrett in the Rose Garden of the White House on Sept. 26. Photo: Oliver Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

Democratic and Republican lawmakers along with other leading political figures reacted to President Trump's Saturday afternoon nomination of federal appeals court Judge Amy Coney Barrett to succeed Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg on the Supreme Court.

What they're saying: "President Trump could not have made a better decision," Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said in a statement. "Judge Amy Coney Barrett is an exceptionally impressive jurist and an exceedingly well-qualified nominee to the Supreme Court of the United States."

Amy Coney Barrett: "Should I be confirmed, I will be mindful of who came before me"

Trump introduces Amy Coney Barrett as nominee to replace Ruth Bader Ginsburg. Photo: Olivier Douleiry/Getty Images

In speaking after President Trump announced her as the Supreme Court nominee to replaced Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Circuit Court Judge Amy Coney Barrett said on Saturday she will be "mindful" of those who came before her on the court if confirmed.

What she's saying: Barrett touched on Ginsburg's legacy, as well as her own judicial philosophy and family values. "I love the United States and I love the United States Constitution," she said. "I'm truly humbled at the prospect of serving on the  Supreme Court."