Updated Dec 17, 2019

Prosecutors say Lev Parnas hid $1 million payment from Russia

Photo: Scott Heins/Getty Images

A judge has rejected a request by prosecutors in the Southern District of New York to revoke bail for Lev Parnas for making false statements about his assets, including a $1 million payment he allegedly received from Russia in September.

The latest: In a filing Tuesday, prosecutors said the money came from a Swiss lawyer to Dmytro Firtash, a Ukrainian oligarch fighting extradition to the U.S. on bribery and racketeering charges. Firtash, who is believed to have links to Russian organized crime, is represented in the U.S. by Trump-allied attorneys Joseph DiGenova and Victoria Toensing.

Why it matters: Parnas is an associate of Rudy Giuliani's who was indicted in October on campaign finance charges. He helped connect Giuliani with Ukrainian officials who pushed unsubstantiated allegations about Joe Biden and his son, eventually resulting in an impeachment inquiry after President Trump and Giuliani led a campaign to pressure Ukraine to investigate the allegations.

The big picture: Parnas' lawyer Joseph Bondy has repeatedly requested that prosecutors turn over documents they seized so that Parnas could provide them to the House Intelligence Committee for its impeachment inquiry. Call records in the Democrats' impeachment report show that Parnas communicated with the committee's ranking member Devin Nunes (R-Calif.), which Bondy has claimed his client remembers.

Read the court filing.

Go deeper: Call records show Devin Nunes in contact with Parnas

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Pelosi's new card to play on impeachment

Protester Laura Albinson of Pasadena, Md., greets House members as they leave the Capitol on Friday. Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi suddenly has a new lever as she pushes Senate Republicans to include witnesses and documents in President Trump's impeachment trial — a "trove" of text messages turned over by Lev Parnas, the indicted former Rudy Giuliani associate.

Why it matters: A public release of some or all of the materials could give Democrats new ammunition to argue that the White House must turn over more information and allow new testimony from witnesses.

Go deeperArrowJan 14, 2020

Schiff sends House Judiciary Committee records from Lev Parnas

Lev Parnas. Photo: Stephanie Keith/Getty Images

House Intelligence Chairman Adam Schiff (D-Calif.) sent a letter to House Judiciary Chairman Jerry Nadler (D-N.Y.) on Tuesday notifying him of two flash drives containing additional evidence related to the impeachment inquiry, which was obtained from indicted Giuliani associate Lev Parnas.

Why it matters: As Axios' Alayna Treene reported earlier today, a public release of some or all of these materials could give Democrats new ammunition to argue that the White House must turn over more information and allow new testimony from witnesses.

Go deeperArrowJan 14, 2020

Yovanovitch urges Ukraine probe after Parnas phone records release

Marie Yovanovitch, former U.S. Ambassador to Ukraine, appears before the House Intelligence Committee on Nov. 15 in Washington, D.C. Photo: Matt McClain/The Washington Post via Getty Images

A lawyer for former U.S. ambassador to Ukraine Marie Yovanovitch told MSNBC Tuesday an investigation should be launched into whether she was monitored in Kyiv after newly released records shed new light on events leading up to her ouster.

Driving the news: House Democrats released a trove of documents earlier Tuesday, including phone records of Lev Parnas, an associate of President Trump's personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani, which appear to indicate he discussed surveilling Yovanovitch in March 2019.

Go deeperArrowJan 15, 2020