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Photo: Getty Images

Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan (R) told the Washington Post on Thursday that he did not vote for President Trump in the 2020 election, instead casting a write-in vote for former President Ronald Reagan.

The big picture: Hogan, who weighed a primary challenge against the president, has been one of the Republican Party's most outspoken figures during the Trump administration. He stood against Trump's controversial tweets calling Baltimore a "rodent infested mess" and bemoaned the White House's coronavirus response.

  • Hogan is seen as a potential 2024 Republican presidential candidate.
  • His tenure is term-limited at the end of this year, though he has not yet expressed any plans to seek another office.

What he's saying: Hogan told the Post that he's on a mission to "help a little bit and show Democrats the kind of Republican they can feel comfortable voting for."

  • He said Reagan was his "hero in politics," adding, "I know it's simply symbolic. It's not going to change the outcome in my state. But I thought it was important to just cast a vote that showed the kind of person I'd like to see in office."

The big picture: A number of top Republicans have said they won't vote for Trump this year, including Massachusetts Gov. Charlie Baker, Vermont Gov. Phil Scott, Sen. Mitt Romney (Utah) and Trump's former national security adviser John Bolton.

  • Some Republicans — including 2016 presidential candidates Carly Fiorina and former Ohio Gov. John Kasich — have said they'll vote for Joe Biden.

Go deeper

Updated 13 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Arizona Republicans censure Cindy McCain and GOP governor

Combination images of Cindy McCain and Gov. Doug Ducey. Photo: FilmMagic/FilmMagic for U.S.VETS/Michael Brochstein/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Arizona Republican Party members voted on Saturday to censure prominent GOP figures Cindy McCain, Gov. Doug Ducey and former Sen. Jeff Flake (R-Ariz.), who've all faced clashes with former President Trump.

Why it matters: Although the resolution is symbolic, this move plus the re-election of the Trump-endorsed Kelli Ward as state GOP chair shows the strong hold the former president has on the party in Arizona, despite President Biden winning the state in the 2020 election.

GOP implosion: Trump threats, payback

Spotted last week on a work van in Evansville, Ind. Photo: Sam Owens/The Evansville Courier & Press via Reuters

The GOP is getting torn apart by a spreading revolt against party leaders for failing to stand up for former President Trump and punish his critics.

Why it matters: Republican leaders suffered a nightmarish two months in Washington. Outside the nation’s capital, it's even worse.

Erica Pandey, author of @Work
3 hours ago - Economy & Business

The limits of Biden's plan to cancel student debt

Data: New York Fed Consumer Credit Panel/Equifax; Chart: Axios Visuals

There’s a growing consensus among Americans who want President Biden to cancel student debt — but addressing the ballooning debt burden is much more complicated than it seems.

Why it matters: Student debt is stopping millions of Americans from buying homes, buying cars and starting families. And the crisis is rapidly getting worse.