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Cover via An America United

Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan, one of the Republican Party's top future presidential prospects, has a book out Tuesday, "Still Standing," that describes how seriously he considered challenging President Trump for re-election.

What he's saying: Hogan writes that he told them he had no interest in launching "a suicide mission" if he didn't think he had a prayer to win: "But a short, energetic campaign might be right up my alley. 'I’m pretty good at retail politics,' I said."

  • "I'm not just wandering around the states hitchhiking," Hogan recalls joking to reporters in New Hampshire after a trip to Iowa.

Hogan says he waited for Trump to unleash a nickname:

  • "I assumed he would go with 'Fat Larry,' an obvious choice as I had admittedly put on some weight since my cancer battle. Or maybe 'Cancer Boy.' That would be a good one. But it didn’t happen."

"I never attack the president personally," Hogan continues:

Never call him a name. I’d really prefer not to talk about him at all. I stay focused on my job as governor. But when something rises to the level that I really disagree with, something that’s just so offensive or that directly hurts the people of Maryland, I stand up and say something. ...
I'm respectful of President Trump. But unlike a lot of Republicans, I won’t just stay silent, swear allegiance, and blindly toe the line.
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Go deeper

The top Republicans who aren't voting for Trump in 2020

Photo: Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan said last week that he cannot support President Trump's re-election.

Why it matters: Hogan, a moderate governor in a blue state, joins other prominent Republicans who have publicly said they will either not vote for Trump's re-election this November or will back Biden.

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Net neutrality on the line under Biden

Federal net neutrality rules are back on the table in the Biden administration, after being nixed by Trump, but now might be complicated by the debate over social media companies' behavior.

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House grants waiver for retired Gen. Lloyd Austin to lead Pentagon

Defense Secretary nominee Lloyd Austin Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

The House voted 326-78 on Thursday to grant retired Gen. Lloyd Austin a waiver to lead the Pentagon, clearing the way for the Senate to confirm President Biden's nominee for defense secretary as early as this week.

Why it matters: Austin's nomination received pushback from some lawmakers, including Democrats, who cited a law that requires officers be out of the military for at least seven years before taking the job — a statute intended to reinforce the tradition of civilian control of the Pentagon.

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