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Combination images of Rep. Matt Gaetz and former Rep. Katie Hill. Photo: Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images/Zach Gibson/Getty Images

Former Rep. Katie Hill (D-Calif.) wrote an op-ed for Vanity Fair Monday that said Rep. Matt Gaetz (R-Fla.) should resign if there's "a fraction of truth" to sexual misconduct allegations.

Driving the news: Hill said she "forged an unlikely friendship in Congress" with Gaetz, who defended her over claims she had an inappropriate sexual relationship with a staffer that saw her resign amid a House ethics probe. She noted Gatez denied the claims against him, but he needs to be "held responsible" if they're true.

For the record: Gaetz has continued to deny allegations of sex trafficking, sexual misconduct with a 17-year-old girl and claims he shared naked images of women to other Congress members.

  • He doubled down on his denials Monday, slamming the Department of Justice in a Washington Examiner op-ed for its investigation into the claims, saying he's "absolutely not resigning."
  • "I am a representative in Congress, not a monk, and certainly not a criminal," wrote Gaetz, who was a Rising star in the Republican Party and close ally of former President Trump.

Of note: Hill noted that Gaetz "spoke out" on her behalf after a "malicious nude-photo leak" she says involved her former husband following the inappropriate relationship allegations "upended" her life.

  • "If true, Matt had engaged in the very practice he'd defended me from," Hill wrote.
  • "Sharing intimate images or videos of someone without their consent should be illegal, plain and simple. It shouldn’t matter if it was done to hurt someone, as with revenge porn, or to brag about your sexual conquests, like Matt has been accused of doing."

Go deeper

Former Gaetz aide says FBI contacted him for sex-trafficking probe

Rep. Matt Gaetz. Photo: Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

A former aide to Rep. Matt Gaetz (R-Fla.) said Monday that two FBI agents questioned him after people in the media told the FBI that he knew of Gaetz's alleged involvement in illegal sex-trafficking activities.

Driving the news: Nathan Nelson, Gaetz's former director of military affairs, denied at a press conference Monday that he had any knowledge of the matter, and he said that his resignation last fall was not related to the Department of Justice probe into the Florida congressman.

John Frank, author of Denver
Apr 5, 2021 - Axios Denver

Colorado judiciary's sexual harassment scandal faces lack of transparency

Colorado Supreme Court Chief Justice Brian D. Boatright, center, ahead of an address at the Capitol in February. Photo: AAron Ontiveroz/The Denver Post via Getty Images

The chief justice of the Colorado Supreme Court promised a "culture change" as he announced an independent investigation into allegations of sexual harassment within the judiciary.

But months later, the process to hire an outside investigator remains hidden from the public's view as the scandal continues to get worse.

Home confinees face imminent return to prison

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Thousands of prisoners who've been in home confinement for as long as a year because of the pandemic face returning to prison when it's over — unless President Biden rescinds a last-minute Trump Justice Department memo.

Why it matters: Most prisoners were told they would not have to come back as they were released early with ankle bracelets. Now, their lives are on hold while they wait to see whether or when they may be forced back behind bars. Advocates say about 4,500 people are affected.