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Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Sen. Johnny Isakson (R-Ga.) announced Wednesday that he will resign at the end of 2019 to focus on his health.

Why it matters: His decision means that two Senate seats will be up for grabs in Georgia, a potential swing state, in 2020.

  • Isakson was last elected in 2016, meaning that his term doesn't expire until 2022.
  • Republican Gov. Brian Kemp will appoint someone to Isakson's seat upon his retirement, and a special election will be held for the final two years of the term in 2020.
  • Georgia's other Republican senator, David Perdue, is up for re-election in 2020 as well.

The big picture: Isakson was hospitalized last month after he fell in his D.C. apartment, breaking four ribs.

Between the lines: Democrats have already expressed hope that they might be able to flip Georgia in 2020 after Stacey Abrams' 2018 gubernatorial run made national headlines.

Go deeper: Trump's 2020 map from hell

Go deeper

NRA files for bankruptcy, says it will reincorporate in Texas

Wayne LaPierre of the National Rifle Association (NRA) speaks during CPAC in 2016. Photo: Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

The National Rifle Association said Friday it has filed for voluntary bankruptcy as part of a restructuring plan.

Driving the news: The gun rights group said it would reincorporate in Texas, calling New York, where it is currently registered, a "toxic political environment." Last year, New York Attorney General Letitia James filed a lawsuit to dissolve the NRA, alleging the group committed fraud by diverting roughly $64 million in charitable donations over three years to support reckless spending by its executives.

25 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Biden: "We will manage the hell out of" vaccine distribution

Joe Biden. Photo: Chip Somodevilla / Getty Images

President-elect Joe Biden promised to invoke the Defense Production Act to increase vaccine manufacturing, as he outlined a five-point plan to administer 100 million COVID-19 vaccinations in the first months of his presidency.

Why it matters: With the Center for Disease Control and Prevention warning of a more contagious variant of the coronavirus, Biden is trying to establish how he’ll approach the pandemic differently than President Trump.

A new Washington

Photo: Stefani Reynolds/Getty Image

D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser said Friday that the city should expect a "new normal" for security — even after President-elect Biden's inauguration.

The state of play: Inaugurations are usually a point of celebration in D.C., but over 20,000 troops are now patrolling Washington streets in an unprecedented preparation for Biden's swearing-in on Jan. 20.

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