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President Trump's senior adviser Jared Kushner told me during an exclusive interview with Israel's Channel 13 News that many of his efforts since he started working at the White House were focused on "cleaning up the messes that Vice President Biden left behind."

Why it matters: Kushner’s swing against Biden came in response to Biden’s remarks during an interview with CBS' "60 Minutes" over the weekend, when the former vice president said it was "improper" for Trump to appoint his son-in-law Kushner and daughter Ivanka for senior positions in the White House.

  • The Democratic presidential hopeful said that he will not appoint any of his kids to government jobs if he is elected president in 2020.
  • Kushner said that Biden is entitled to his opinion, but stated that Trump is entitled to pick his team. He added that he and Ivanka "worked with [Trump] for a long time, and I think we have done a good job of trying to help him being successful."

The big picture: Kushner gave several examples of his White House work that he claimed was aimed at fixing problems created by Biden — specifically, criminal justice reform.

  • Kushner said that reforms enacted by the Trump administration "rolled back a lot of the very harsh laws that were created and partially written by Vice President Biden over 20 years ago, which put a lot of African Americans in prison and really destroyed a generation and did a lot of harm to our country."

Between the lines, via Axios' Margaret Talev: Biden so far has been the top 2020 candidate for African American voters in many polls, but he also has taken some criticism for his work on the 1994 crime bill, and for statements seen as racially insensitive or outdated on issues from busing to the legacy of slavery to the value of bipartisan political friendships with people associated with segregation.

  • Kushner's implication that Biden's Senate legacy harmed African American voters could be aimed at both weakening him in the primary contest and foreshadowing an argument Trump might try to use against Biden in the general election if he emerges as the nominee. 

Kushner also criticized Biden for helping to negotiate the TPP trade deal, which Trump withdrew from, and for U.S. policy in the Middle East during his vice presidency.

  • "We inherited an ISIS caliphate, Iran was strong, Libya was a mess and a lot of our allies felt abandoned. We worked very hard over the last three years to try and rebuild the Middle East and to put it in a much more stable framing."

Go deeper:

Go deeper

30 mins ago - Politics & Policy

McConnell drops filibuster demand, paving way for power-sharing deal

Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (R) and Minority Leader Mitch McConnell attend a joint session of Congress. Photo: Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell has abandoned his demand that Democrats state, in writing, that they would not abandon the legislative filibuster.

Between the lines: McConnell was never going to agree to a 50-50 power sharing deal without putting up a fight over keeping the 60-vote threshold. But the minority leader ultimately caved after it became clear that delaying the organizing resolution was no longer feasible.

2 hours ago - Technology

Scoop: Google won't donate to members of Congress who voted against election results

Sen. Ted Cruz led the group of Republicans who opposed certifying the results. Photo: Stefani Reynolds/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

Google will not make contributions from its political action committee this cycle to any member of Congress who voted against certifying the results of the presidential election, following the deadly Capitol riot.

Why it matters: Several major businesses paused or pulled political donations following the events of Jan. 6, when pro-Trump rioters, riled up by former President Trump, stormed the Capitol on the day it was to certify the election results.

2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Minority Mitch still setting Senate agenda

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Chuck Schumer may be majority leader, yet in many ways, Mitch McConnell is still running the Senate show — and his counterpart is about done with it.

Why it matters: McConnell rolled over Democrats unapologetically, and kept tight control over his fellow Republicans, while in the majority. But he's showing equal skill as minority leader, using political jiujitsu to convert a perceived weakness into strength.