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Jaime Harrison, who lost his bid to unseat Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C) after raising record-breaking amounts of money, told CNN on Tuesday that he is open to working with the Biden administration in any capacity, including chairing the Democratic National Committee.

Why it matters: Harrison, who has the support of the influential House Majority Whip Jim Clyburn (D-S.C.), has said that he would consider the role of DNC chair if offered. On Tuesday, Harrison launched a new PAC focused on long-term investments in areas seen as Democratic reaches, according to AP.

What he's saying: "Whatever they believe that I can do and be helpful on in terms of building back better, I'm on. I'm all in. So, if it's the DNC, call my number and I will be there," Harrison said, adding that Democrats "have to rebuild and revitalize this party."

  • "We can't just be a political organization, we've got to be a community-based organization, where we have sustained relationships."

When asked specifically how the Democratic Party needs to change, Harrison explained that his new PAC was named after a dirt road in South Carolina that was not paved after Democrats and Republicans had promised to improve infrastructure.

  • "That dirt road is symbolic of the broken promises we see all around this country that people hold, and they come from Democrats and Republicans," Harrison said. 
  • "I believe that those are the people that Democrats need to come out, those are the folks who are jaded right now with this political process and we have to rebuild their trust, that we are the party that's going to fight for them."

Go deeper

Sanders says Democrats will push coronavirus relief package through with simple majority

Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) leaves the Senate floor on Jan. 1. Photo: Liz Lynch/Getty Images

Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.), incoming chair of the Senate Budget Committee who caucuses with the Democrats, told CNN's "State of the Union" on Sunday that Democrats plan to push a coronavirus relief package through the chamber with a simple majority vote.

Why it matters: "Budget reconciliation" would allow Democrats to forgo the Senate's 60-vote requirement and could potentially speed-up the next relief package for millions of unemployed Americans. Democrats hold the the 50-50 split in the Senate with Vice President Kamala Harris serving as the tie-breaking vote.

4 mins ago - World

Russian authorities say Navalny has been transferred to hospital

Photo: Mikhail Svetlov/Getty Images

Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny has been hospitalized, one day after his doctor warned that the jailed Putin critic "could die at any moment," Russia's prison service said Monday.

Why it matters: News that Navalny's condition had severely deteriorated on the third week of a hunger strike prompted outrage from his supporters and international demands for Russia to provide him with immediate medical treatment.

Felix Salmon, author of Capital
15 mins ago - Economy & Business

The state worst hit by the pandemic

Data: Hamilton Place Strategies; Chart: Will Chase/Axios

When the coronavirus pandemic hit, the job facing governments was to save lives and save jobs. Very few states did well on both measures, while New York, almost uniquely, did particularly badly on both.

Why it matters: The jury is still out on whether there was a trade-off between the dual imperatives; a new analysis from Hamilton Place Strategies shows no clear correlation between the two.