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Photo: Nathan Ouellette/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images; Win McNamee/Getty Images

South Carolina Senate candidate Jaime Harrison's campaign announced Sunday it raised $57 million in the third quarter of 2020, shattering the quarterly fundraising record for a Senate race set by Beto O'Rourke in 2018 by almost $20 million.

Why it matters: Harrison's massive fundraising hauls have fueled his run to unseat Sen. Lindsey Graham, a close ally of President Trump who is now facing the most competitive re-election race of his career. The outcome of the South Carolina contest could be pivotal in determining control of the Senate.

The state of play: Recent polling has indicated that the race is virtually tied. Graham and Harrison both received 48% of the vote in a Quinnipiac poll published in September.

By the numbers: Harrison's campaign said it received 1.5 million donations from 994,000 donors, with an average of $37 per gift. The campaign has raised $86 million total this cycle.

What they're saying: “This campaign is making history, because we’re focused on restoring hope back to South Carolina,” Guy King, Harrison's campaign spokesperson said.

  • “While Lindsey Graham continues playing political games in Washington, Jaime Harrison is remaining laser-focused on the real issues impacting people here — like healthcare, broadband access, and COVID relief for businesses and families."
  • "After 25 years in Washington, Lindsey Graham has changed into someone voters no longer recognize, and these resources will be instrumental in our efforts to send Lindsey home in November.”

Go deeper: Lindsey Graham refuses to take COVID test for S.C. Senate debate

Go deeper

Inside the West Wing: Trump didn't want to go back to Georgia

Trump at a rally in Georgia on Dec. 5. Photo: Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images

With his anger rising at Georgia officials, President Trump resisted going back to the Peach State after his first runoff rally on Dec. 5.

Behind the scenes: He told advisers he didn't think he needed to go back. Both candidates, Sens. Kelly Loeffler and David Perdue, put in a huge behind-the-scenes effort to get him to go back. He plugged them during his Monday rally, but also ranted about the state's Republican officials and election machinery.

The rebellion against Silicon Valley (the place)

Photo illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios. Smith Collection/Gado via Getty Images

Silicon Valley may be a "state of mind," but it's also very much a real enclave in Northern California. Now, a growing faction of the tech industry is boycotting it.

Why it matters: The Bay Area is facing for the first time the prospect of losing its crown as the top destination for tech workers and startups — which could have an economic impact on the region and force it to reckon with its local issues.

Erica Pandey, author of @Work
1 hour ago - Economy & Business

Telework's tax mess

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

As teleworkers flit from city to city, they're creating a huge tax mess.

Why it matters: Our tax laws aren't built for telecommuting, and this new way of working could have dire implications for city and state budgets.