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Back row: GenderCool co-founder Gearah Goldstein, along with youth champions Ashton, Daniel and Lia; Front row: Eevee, Jonathan and GenderCool co-founder Jennifer Grosshandler. Photo: Spencer Aldworth Brown for Intuit

Intuit held a daylong trans summit last week that looked at the experiences of its own trans workers as well as bringing in trans youth from the GenderCool Project to get their perspective.

Why it matters: Historically, the discussion around transgender people in tech has focused a lot on workers that have transitioned at some point in their working careers. But many in the next generation of workers are entering the workforce as their authentic selves.

  • Plus, trans youth are increasingly in the crosshairs of legislators, with bills pending in a number of states that would criminalize doctors who provide them with gender-affirming healthcare.

What they're saying:

  • Intuit CEO Sasan Goodarzi said he feels passionate about the need for inclusion at work, in part based on his own experience after moving to the U.S. from Iran at age 9. "I was bullied in school every day," he said. "I was told to go back home."
  • Tanner Arnold, who works at Intuit's Tucson office, says his experience as a transgender man allows him to help make the company's products more inclusive, such as the ability to add a third gender in QuickBooks. "We want to represent all facets of our customers," he said.

The key message from the GenderCool youths was that while they were all transgender, they were so much more than that.

  • Jonathan skipped high school and started college when he was 14.
  • Eevee is teaching herself Italian using the mobile app Duolingo.
  • Daniel is mostly vegan, but will eat eggs from the chickens his family raises.
  • Ashton is trying to teach himself piano.
  • Lia sang with her jazz band at Disney World.
  • "Our stories are way cooler than just being trans," Jonathan said.

What's next: Intuit says it plans to make an annual affair of the event, which also brought in a smattering of folks from other Bay Area companies, including VMWare, Impossible Foods, Airbnb, Adobe and Bank of the West.

Go deeper: Intel opens up about its (lack of) diversity

Go deeper

Mike Allen, author of AM
2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Biden's "overwhelming force" doctrine

President-elect Biden arrives to introduce his science team in Wilmington yesterday. Photo: Kevin Lamarque/Reuters

President-elect Biden has ordered up a shock-and-awe campaign for his first days in office to signal, as dramatically as possible, the radical shift coming to America and global affairs, his advisers tell us. 

The plan, Part 1 ... Biden, as detailed in a "First Ten Days" memo from incoming chief of staff Ron Klain, plans to unleash executive orders, federal powers and speeches to shift to a stark, national plan for "100 million shots" in three months.

Off the Rails

Episode 2: Barbarians at the Oval

Photo illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios. Photo: Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images

Beginning on election night 2020 and continuing through his final days in office, Donald Trump unraveled and dragged America with him, to the point that his followers sacked the U.S. Capitol with two weeks left in his term. This Axios series takes you inside the collapse of a president.

Episode 2: Trump stops buying what his professional staff are telling him, and increasingly turns to radical voices telling him what he wants to hear. Read episode 1.

President Trump plunked down in an armchair in the White House residence, still dressed from his golf game — navy fleece, black pants, white MAGA cap. It was Saturday, Nov. 7. The networks had just called the election for Joe Biden.

Fringe right plots new attacks out of sight

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Domestic extremists are using obscure and private corners of the internet to plot new attacks ahead of Inauguration Day. Their plans are also hidden in plain sight, buried in podcasts and online video platforms.

Why it matters: Because law enforcement was caught flat-footed during last week's Capitol siege, researchers and intelligence agencies are paying more attention to online threats that could turn into real-world violence.