Dec 11, 2019

Intel opens up about its (lack of) diversity

Photo: Rafael Henrique/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Intel revealed its racial and gender pay discrepancies on Tuesday.

What they said: Among 52 top executives at Intel, who all earn more than $200,000, 77% are white or Asian men and eight are white women. There is one Asian woman, one Hispanic woman, one black woman and one black man, with no Hispanic men counted among the top executives.

  • "The ratio was similarly skewed across manager, professional and technician job classifications, with white and Asian men dominating top pay groups and women and people of color clustered in the lower bands," Bloomberg noted.
  • "Intel’s report finds that within job types — not just at the top — white men dominate the highest salary band. Two-thirds of employees fall into a job group called 'professionals,' which includes includes non-managerial office workers and programmers."
  • "Nearly all earn at least $80,000 per year, but white and Asian men have the highest salaries. Black, Hispanic and other minorities are overrepresented in the bottom half of the pay ranges," per Bloomberg.

Why now: “It’s difficult to really fix what you aren’t being transparent about,” Barbara Whye, Intel’s chief diversity and inclusion officer and a vice president in human resources, tells Bloomberg.

Go deeper: Minority-owned banks are disappearing

Go deeper

Intel and Uber come clean on pay equity, sexual assault

If you're a white man who works at Intel, there's a 27.8% chance that you make more than $208,000 per year. If you're a black woman who works at Intel, there's only a 9.5% chance that you make that much.

Go deeperArrowDec 12, 2019

Exclusive poll: Black Americans motivated by Trump to vote in 2020

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

A majority of black Americans are more interested in voting in the 2020 presidential election than they were in 2016, according to a national survey of 1200 black voters and non-voters conducted by Third Way and the Joint Center.

Why it matters: Black voter turnout declined significantly in 2016 nationally and in key swing states, ultimately contributing to Hillary Clinton's loss to Donald Trump. New details from focus groups and polling suggests that the motivation to remove Trump from office is firing up black Americans to head to the polls next November.

Go deeperArrowDec 30, 2019

Why 50+ women care about 2020

Data: AARP/Harris Poll; Chart: Axios Visuals

A new AARP survey by the Harris Poll examined what's driving women 50 and older ahead of next year's elections and found health care on top. The survey also found that older women’s concerns about Trump are eroding, but not upending, his support with Republicans and independents.

Why it matters: As the House of Representatives prepares to impeach the president, the priorities for this group of high-propensity voters are closer to home and different from what their male counterparts care most about.

Go deeperArrowDec 18, 2019