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Photo illustration: Budrul Chukrut/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

After months in which the Commerce Department indicated it might ease some trade restrictions on Chinese tech giant Huawei, some U.S. companies are beginning to receive waivers allowing them to supply Huawei with components, according to reports in the Wall Street Journal and elsewhere.

Why it matters: U.S. companies were making millions of dollars selling chips, software and other components to Huawei until the Trump administration put the company on a trade blacklist, largely over national security concerns.

The big picture: Huawei is just one flashpoint in a broad U.S. dispute with China, one that extends beyond short-term conflicts over tariffs to broader issues like censorship, artificial intelligence, intellectual-property theft, spying and technology leadership.

  • As we have written, both China and the U.S. appear to crave a world in which they aren't reliant on one another in tech, but neither knows how to disentangle itself from the other.
  • The U.S. depends on China for the bulk of electronics manufacturing, while China still relies on a number of American components, including software and chips.

Huawei isn't the only company caught up in the dispute.

  • While its role as one of the key players in next-generation cellular technology has made Huawei a focus, U.S. attention has also fallen on Huawei's smaller Chinese rival, ZTE, as well as TikTok and a number of makers of facial recognition technology.

Meanwhile: Huawei's inclusion on the so-called entity list, which limits the ability of U.S. companies to sell goods and services to Huawei, is just one of several separate U.S. actions crimping the Chinese firm's business.

  • The FCC will consider on Friday whether to ban companies from using federal telecom subsidies to purchase communications equipment from Chinese firms Huawei and ZTE.
  • The Department of Justice has pending actions against Huawei accusing it of both theft of trade secrets from T-Mobile and violating trade sanctions against Iran.
  • A section of the National Defense Authorization Act prohibits Huawei and others from selling certain gear in the U.S. Huawei has sued the U.S. government, saying the law is unconstitutional.
  • A bill in Congress, H.R. 4459, would establish funds to help smaller carriers replace their current Huawei gear with equipment not alleged to pose a national security risk.
  • President Trump signed an executive order in May declaring a national emergency and prohibiting U.S. companies from using telecom services that are solely owned, controlled, or directed by a foreign adversary.

What they're saying:

  • Semiconductor Industry Association CEO John Neuffer said his organization welcomes the export license approvals. "Sales of these non-sensitive commercial products help ensure the competitiveness of the U.S. semiconductor industry, which is essential to national security."
  • Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, speaking to Fox Business: "We've now been starting to send out the 20-day intent-to-deny letters and some approvals."
  • Huawei declined to comment.

Go deeper:

Go deeper

Updated 2 hours ago - World

Trudeau's Liberals set to form minority government after Canada election win

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau. Photo: Jeff Vinnick/Getty Images

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's Liberal government was reelected for a third term in Monday's parliamentary elections, but preliminary results show it failed to win a majority.

Why it matters: Trudeau has governed Canada with a minority of legislative support in parliament for the past two years. Last month, he called for an election two years earlier than scheduled in the hope of forming a majority government.

DOJ urges Supreme Court not to overturn Roe v Wade

Attorney General Merrick Garland during a Sept. 9 news conference at the Department of Justice in Washington, D.C. Photo: Samuel Corum/Bloomberg via Getty Images

The Department of Justice sought permission Monday to present oral arguments when the Supreme Court hears a case challenging Mississippi's strict abortion law, as it called on justices to uphold Roe v. Wade.

Why it matters: The two briefs, filed by acting solicitor general Brian Fletcher, mark the latest attempt by President Biden's DOJ to "protect the legal right to an abortion," per the New York Times, which first reported on the court filings.

4 hours ago - World

Reports: CIA director's team member reported Havana Syndrome symptoms

Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) director Bill Burns during a House Intelligence Committee hearing in April on Capitol Hill. Photo: Al Drago-Pool/Getty Images

A member of CIA director Bill Burns' team who traveled with him to India this month was treated for "symptoms consistent with Havana syndrome," CNN first reported Monday.

Why it matters: Current and former officials told the New York Times the incident signals a "possible escalation" in the mysterious neurological symptoms affecting as many as 200 Americans who've worked in overseas posts since 2016.