Oct 19, 2019

Report: Huawei in "early-stage" talks to license 5G network to U.S. companies

The Huawei Germany headquarters on Oct. 15. Photo: Rolf Vennenbernd/picture alliance via Getty Images

Chinese telecom giant Huawei has reportedly held early-stage discussions in recent weeks with unnamed U.S. telecoms companies on "licensing its 5G network technology to them," a Huawei executive told Reuters exclusively.

Why it matters: The U.S. and China are locked in a race to get 5G networks up and running to connect devices and machines at lightning speed. U.S. critics have accused Huawei of being complicit in Chinese espionage, a beneficiary of theft of trade secrets and a violator of trade sanctions. Historically, the U.S. preferred European equipment-makers Ericsson and Nokia as suppliers of 5G technology.

Go deeper: Why Huawei is the United States' 5G boogeyman

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China makes the first big 5G move

New China Unicom 5G equipment in Haikou, Hainan Province. Photo: Visual China Group/Getty

China switched on a massive 5G network Friday, bringing 50 cities online in one of the largest-ever single rollouts of the super-fast mobile networks.

Why it matters: Right now, this means some Chinese smartphone users can access super-fast internet. But in the long run, experts worry the deployment could help China vault past the U.S. not only in the critical 5G technology itself but also in the new applications it's expected to support.

Go deeperArrowNov 8, 2019

Qualcomm is launching $200M fund to back companies building out 5G

Qualcomm CEO Steve Mollenkopf speaking at a business roundtable. Photo: Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

Qualcomm's venture arm today announced plans for a $200 million fund aimed at backing companies with the technology needed to build out or take advantage of next generation 5G cellular networks.

Why it matters: Companies with a stake in 5G technology — such as Qualcomm — are eager to tout its great potential. However, achieving that potential will require lots more investment — first in the networks and their accompanying gear, and then in apps and services.

Go deeperArrowOct 24, 2019

FCC to vote on barring subsidies for Huawei, ZTE equipment

Photo: Rolf Vennenbernd/picture alliance via Getty Images

The FCC will vote next month to ban companies from using federal telecom subsidies to purchase communications equipment from Chinese firms Huawei and ZTE.

Driving the news: The FCC’s order, to be voted on at the commission’s Nov. 19 meeting, would bar companies that receive funding from the $8.5 billion Universal Service Fund from using it to purchase equipment or services from suppliers deemed to pose a national security risk.

Go deeperArrowOct 28, 2019