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Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

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Data: The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins; Chart: Axios Visuals

The coronavirus is here and will complicate life for millions of Americans — but there are signs from Asia that it can get better if we're willing to take that pain now.

The big picture: Coronavirus is stifled by early and aggressive action — and no matter how well-intentioned, half-measures only seem to make things worse.

The magic formula from South Korea, Hong Kong and Singapore:

  1. Social distancing on a massive scale, quarantining infected areas, canceling big events and closing schools and offices to slow down the spread.
  2. Intensive testing for all who want it, and surveillance and monitoring of the infected to try to limit outbreaks.
  3. Emergency efforts to ensure people don't avoid care over cost concerns, because everyone is at greater risk of infection if the uninsured and underinsured avoid treatment.

Between the lines: The U.S. response thus far has been a series of half-measures, with predicable results.

  1. Schools and companies have closed after cases pop up, rather than ahead of them. But the closings are beginning to accelerate.
  2. The entire country faces a massive testing shortage, lagging dramatically behind its peers.
  3. Governments have begun to use their muscle, with New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo dispatching the National Guard to help shut down facilities in the area of the state's main outbreak. Multiple states are beginning to declare states of emergencies.

The bottom line: The U.S. is not doing enough to prevent this thing from getting worse, and every day it delays will make it that much harder.

  • President Trump seems focused on preventing a coronavirus recession, but no amount of monetary policy or stimulus will compensate for a public health response that's equal to this virus.

Go deeper:

Editor's note: The chart above has been corrected. It originally showed the total number of U.S. cases, rather than the new cases each day.

Go deeper

14 mins ago - World

South Korean president: Trump "beat around the bush and failed" on North Korea

South Korean President Moon Jae-in speaking in Seoul in March 2021. Photo: Jeon Heon-Kyun/POOL/AFP via Getty Images

South Korean President Moon Jae-in criticized former President Trump's attempts to denuclearize the Korean Peninsula, telling the New York Times he "beat around the bush" with North Korea and "failed to pull it through."

Why it matters: Moon, now in his final year in office, called denuclearization a "matter of survival" for South Korea and urged President Biden to resume negotiations with North Korean leader Kim Jong-un after a standstill of nearly two years.

29 mins ago - World

U.S.-Israel tensions bubble up as Iran talks progress

Photo illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios. Photos: Eric Baradat (AFP), Gali Tibbon (AFP)/Getty Images

As nuclear talks in Vienna enter a critical stage, the gaps and suspicions over Iran between the Israeli government and the Biden administration are growing.

Why it matters: Both sides want to avoid the kind of public fight that emerged during the negotiations over the 2015 deal. But in private, there's growing frustration on both sides about the lack of trust, coordination and transparency.

48 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Cadillac's electric shift begins with launch of 2023 Lyriq SUV

2023 Cadillac Lyriq. Photo: GM

GM plans to start taking orders in September for the 2023 Cadillac Lyriq, a striking electric SUV coming early next year at a starting price of $59,900.

Why it matters: The production version of the Lyriq, which debuted Wednesday, marks the beginning of the luxury brand's phaseout of gasoline-powered vehicles by 2030.

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