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Photo: Mark Wilson/Getty Images

The House of Representatives voted 322-87 on Monday to override President Trump's veto of the $740 billion National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA).

Why it matters: With a Senate vote expected this week, Congress is one step closer to handing Trump the first veto override of his presidency — an overwhelming and bipartisan rebuke that comes just weeks ahead of Joe Biden's inauguration.

The backdrop: Trump warned that he would oppose the critical defense bill, which has been passed by Congress every year since 1967, if lawmakers did not repeal liability protections for social media companies outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act.

  • A number of Republicans have said that they support Trump's efforts to eliminate Section 230 due to alleged anti-conservative bias by tech companies, but insist it doesn't make sense to tie unrelated language to the NDAA.
  • Trump also opposes legislation in the bill that proposes renaming 10 military installations currently named after Confederate leaders.

Worth noting: The House originally voted to pass the NDAA by a 335-78 margin.

Editor's note: This story has been updated to clarify that some Republicans support repealing Section 230, alleging that tech companies are biased against conservatives.

Go deeper

Updated Jan 13, 2021 - Politics & Policy

Trump becomes first president to be impeached twice

Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

The House voted 232-197 to impeach President Trump for “incitement of insurrection" after a violent pro-Trump mob breached the U.S. Capitol last week while Congress met to count the Electoral College vote.

Why it matters: Trump is now the only president in history to have been impeached twice — his first impeachment happened just over a year ago in December of 2019. He has just one week left in his term before President-elect Biden is sworn-in on Jan. 20.

Updated 2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

  1. Health: CDC director defends agency's response to pandemic — CDC warns highly transmissible coronavirus variant could become dominant in U.S. in March.
  2. Politics: Biden readies massive shifts in policy for his first days in office.
  3. Vaccine: Fauci: 100 million doses in 100 days is "absolutely" doable.
  4. Economy: Unemployment filings explode again.
  5. Tech: Kids' screen time sees a big increase.
  6. World: WHO team arrives in China to investigate pandemic origins.
Dave Lawler, author of World
3 hours ago - World

Alexey Navalny detained after landing back in Moscow

Navalny and his wife shortly before he was detained. Photo: Kirill Kudryavtsev/AFP via Getty

Russian opposition leader Alexey Navalny was detained upon his return to Moscow on Sunday, which came five months after he was poisoned with the nerve agent Novichok. He returned despite being warned that he would be arrested.

The latest: Navalny was stopped at a customs checkpoint and led away alone by officers. He appeared to hug his wife goodbye, and his spokesman reports that his lawyer was not allowed to accompany him.