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Five improvised explosive devices that the FBI says "were fully operational and could cause great bodily harm or injury if handled improperly." Photo: FBI/Justice Department

The FBI believes California Gov. Gavin Newsom (D) and the Bay Area headquarters of Twitter and Facebook were targets of a man facing federal explosives charges, according to a criminal complaint.

Driving the news: Prosecutors charged Ian Benjamin Rogers after finding weapons including five pipe bombs, 49 guns and thousands of rounds of ammunition following a Jan. 15 search of his Napa County home and auto repair business. His alleged goal was to ensure former President Trump remained in office.

Officers found a "White Privilege Card" during the search. Photo: FBI/Justice Department
  • The suspected far-right extremist told the FBI he built the bombs "for entertainment purposes only," according to the complaint, filed Tuesday.
  • But agents found text messages sent from the 43-year-old's phone that appeared to target Democrats, Twitter and Facebook after Trump was banned from the social media sites following the Jan. 6 riots at the U.S. Capitol by some of his supporters.

Zoom in: "We can attack Twitter or the democrats you pick," said one message. "We can attack Twitter and democrats easy right now burn they're s--t down."

  • "I'm thinking sac office first target ... Then maybe bird and face offices," said another.
  • FBI Special Agent Stephanie Minor stated in the complaint that she believes "sac" refers to Newsom's Sacramento office.
  • Another message stated, "I hope 45 goes to war if he doesn't I will," which Minor stated she believed was in reference to ensuring that Trump "remained in power" after his election loss.

For the record: Rogers is facing federal charges of unlawful possession of an unregistered destructive device.

  • Napa County District Attorney Allison Haley told the Los Angeles Times Wednesday that he also faces 28 felony charges in state court "for possession of the explosives and weapons, including possession of an illegal silencer and multiple unregistered assault weapons."

Go deeper

Twitter troll charged with 2016 election interference

Photo: Pavlo Gonchar/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

The Justice Department charged a pro-Trump former Twitter user with election interference for posts encouraging users to vote via text in the 2016 election.

Why it matters: The DOJ believes this is the first criminal case charging an American with suppressing the vote via disinformation on Twitter.

Reopening is expensive

Illustration: Brendan Lynch/Axios

Emerging from pandemic lockdown is shaping up to be pricey. Traveling, eating out and even refreshing your wardrobe costs more, per April inflation data out today.

Why it matters: The economy is reopening and suddenly Americans want in on the activities they've gone a year without. The data shows how much that sudden demand has helped push prices higher — at least for now.

Colonial Pipeline restarting service after hack

Photo: Bloomberg via Getty Images

Colonial Pipeline is restarting operations around 5 p.m. ET Wednesday, Energy Secretary Jennifer Granholm announced.

Why it matters: At least 11 states and Washington, D.C., have experienced gas shortages since a ransomware attack forced the critical pipeline running from Texas to New York to shut down on Saturday.