The casket of Rep. Elijah Cummings is carried through National Statuary Hall on Oct. 24. Photo: Al Drago-Pool/Getty Images

Rep. Elijah Cummings was born the son of a sharecropper, and died a leader of such regard that presidents delivered eulogies at his funeral.

The impact: In Baltimore, politicians and civil rights activists joined family and friends on Friday to honor the late congressman, who became the first African-American lawmaker to lie in state at the U.S. Capitol. He died last week at the age of 68.

  • Speaker Pelosi: "As the master of the House, he was also the mentor of the House. Was anybody in here being mentored by Elijah Cummings? I think so. [Applause] ... [It] was no surprise that when we won the Congress, Elijah said: 'Send me as many freshmen as you can, because I want to help them to be oriented for them to reach their fullest potential in the House of Representatives.'"
  • President Obama: "I remember I had the pleasure of meeting Elijah's mother, Ruth, and she told me she prayed for me every day, and I knew it was true, and I felt better for it. Sometimes people say they are praying for you, and you don’t know. They might be praying about you, but you don’t know if they are praying for you. But I knew Miss Ruth was telling the truth."
  • President Clinton: "[W]e should hear him now in the quiet times at night and in the morning, when we need courage, when we get discouraged ..."
    • "When the Lord asked, 'Whom shall I send, and who will go for me?,' Isaiah said, 'Here am I, Lord. Send me.' Elijah Cummings spent a whole life saying, 'Send me.' An entire lifetime. ... [T]he people of Baltimore sent him to Annapolis, and then you sent him to Washington. On behalf of the rest of the nation, I would like to thank you."
  • Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez: "In a Congress whose culture is preoccupied with seniority and tenure, Chairman Cummings was uniquely focused on the next generation. ... He never, ever let a person go unseen."
  • Hillary Clinton: “Like the prophet, our Elijah could call down fire from heaven. But he also prayed and worked for healing."

Go deeper ... In photos: The life and work of Rep. Elijah Cummings

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Senate to vote on Amy Coney Barrett's confirmation on Oct. 26

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell in the Capitol on Oct. 20. Photo: Stefani Reynolds/Getty Images

The Senate will vote to confirm Judge Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court next Monday, Oct. 26, Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) announced Tuesday.

The big picture: The Senate Judiciary Committee will vote this Thursday to advance Barrett's nomination to the full Senate floor. Democrats have acknowledged that there's nothing procedurally they can do to stop Barrett's confirmation, which will take place just one week out from Election Day.

Updated 3 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

  1. Politics: Americans feel Trump's sickness makes him harder to trustFlorida breaks record for in-person early voting.
  2. Health: The next wave is gaining steam.
  3. Education: Schools haven't become hotspots.
  4. World: Ireland moving back into lockdown — Argentina becomes 5th country to report 1 million infections.

Meadows confirms Trump's tweets "declassifying" Russia documents were false

Photo: Tom Williams-Pool/Getty Images

White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows confirmed in court on Tuesday that President Trump's tweets authorizing the disclosure of documents related to the Russia investigation and Hillary Clinton's emails "were not self-executing declassification orders," after a federal judge demanded that Trump be asked about his intentions.

Why it matters: BuzzFeed News reporter Jason Leopold cited the tweets in an emergency motion seeking to gain access to special counsel Robert Mueller's unredacted report as part of a Freedom of Information Act request. This is the first time Trump himself has indicated, according to Meadows, that his tweets are not official directives.