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Photo: Mario Tama/Getty Images

The Walmart store in El Paso, Texas, where a mass shooting killed 22 people in early August will reopen its doors on Thursday, per the AP.

The big picture: The AP reports that the retail chain has hired off-duty police officers to staff its stores across the city — a security measure that El Paso's police department spokesman said it had once practiced but discontinued by the time of the shooting.

  • Walmart is facing lawsuits from some victims of the El Paso shooting over its lack of in-store security.
  • In the wake of the shooting, it discontinued handgun ammunition and all sales of short-barrel rifle ammunition that can be used with military-style assault weapons in September.

The other side: Walmart said it couldn't discuss the security plans for its stores — both in El Paso and across the country.

  • "We typically do not share our security measures publicly because it could make them less effective, but they may include hiring additional security, adding cameras in store and using 'lot cops' in the parking lot. We will continue our long-standing practice of regularly evaluating our staffing, training, procedures, and technology which are designed to provide a safe working and shopping experience," Walmart spokeswoman Delia Garcia told the AP.

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