Economy & Business - Media

Media

The big picture

A true digital media publishing breakthrough

Multiple companies turned a profit last year.

Jan 21, 2020 - Economy & Business
Campaigns target younger voters online

Social media makes it easy for campaigns to buy ads targeted to different age groups.

Dec 14, 2019 - Economy & Business
A new entertainment world order

Broadcast networks were shut out of Golden Globe nominations.

Dec 10, 2019 - Economy & Business
The free press is getting squeezed, even in democracies

Charges against Benjamin Netanyahu highlight the trend

Nov 26, 2019 - Economy & Business
A nation of news consumption hypocrites

The topics we say we want covered more aren't the topics we actually read, according to an Axios analysis.

Jun 11, 2019 - Economy & Business
The topics that work best on the different platforms

Politics finds a home on Facebook, Twitter and Reddit.

May 7, 2019 - Economy & Business

All Media stories

Facebook says political candidates can use paid memes

Photo: Chesnot/Getty Images

Facebook said Friday that political candidates, campaigns and groups can use paid branded content across its platforms, a clarification prompted by a move from Michael Bloomberg's campaign to pay top Instagram influencers to post memes on its behalf.

The big picture: Its policy didn't explicitly state that it was OK for candidates to use branded content posts, but after hearing from various campaigns about the issue, Facebook moved to clarify its stance.

Local publishing giant McClatchy files for bankruptcy

The Sacarmento Bee is one of the many local newspapers owned and operated by McClatchy. Photo: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

McClatchy announced Thursday that it voluntarily filed for bankruptcy to allow the company to restructure its debt and pension obligations.

Why it matters: The bankruptcy ends family control of one of the largest newspaper publishers in the country. It will also hand the company to creditors, who "have expressed support for independent journalism," McClatchy DC writes.

Spotify to pay up to $196 million in cash for The Ringer

Bill Simmons. Photo: Mike Windle / Staff/Getty Images

Spotify disclosed in an SEC filing Wednesday that it is paying up to $196 million for The Ringer, a sports media company founded by former ESPN personality Bill Simmons.

Why it matters: It's a solid payout for The Ringer, which was created just four years ago. The Ringer's podcast revenues surpassed $15 million in 2018, and the company says it's profitable.

"Parasite" studio CJ Entertainment buys into Hollywood

CEO of Skydance Media David Ellison (left) with Terminator actors on Oct. 23, 2019 in Beijing, China. Photo: VCG/VCG via Getty Images

Skydance Media, a Hollywood film studio whose franchises include Mission Impossible and Terminator, raised $275 million in new equity funding at around a $2.3 billion valuation. RedBird Capital Partners led, and was joined by South Korea's CJ Entertainment and return backer Tencent.

Why it matters: This comes just days after CJ Entertainment's Parasite became the first foreign-language film to win the Academy Award for best picture, and could help Skydance access a deep library of IP that hasn't yet been introduced to U.S. audiences.

Trump's acquittal brings Fox News its best ratings since his election and inauguration

Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

The week of President Trump's impeachment acquittal was Fox News' fifth most-watched week and its highest since the weeks surrounding the 2016 election and the president's inauguration, AP reports.

Why it matters: Fox News averaged 4.27 million viewers in prime time last week. The basic cable network was bested only by major networks ABC, which televised the Academy Awards, and CBS.

Americans had the ability to watch over 646,000 TV shows in 2019

Illustration: Sarah Grillo / Axios

There were over 646,000 shows available in the U.S. across linear and streaming services last year, according to Nielsen's latest Total Audience report, a 10% increase from all of 2018.

Why it matters: As more streaming platforms emerge to compete for consumers' attention and budgets, the burden is falling on consumers to navigate an overwhelming number of content choices.

Media companies eye sportsbook partnerships to juice engagement

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Almost all major media companies are teaming up with sportsbooks to juice their content offerings.

Why it matters: The partnerships allow media organizations to increase engagement while sportsbooks can acquire more customers.

Luminary's global expansion could heat up the podcast subscription wars

Reproduced from The Nielsen Total Audience Report, February 2020; Chart: Axios Visuals

Luminary is expanding its service to three new countries, New Zealand, South Africa, and Ireland, sources tell Axios.

Why it matters: Its subscription podcast offering is bolstered by offering dozens of podcasts to users exclusively on its platform. Most Americans subscribe to multiple video services, but not multiple audio services, according to Nielsen. But that could soon change if more podcasts begin to be offered exclusively on certain platforms.

Scoop: YouTube to fund launch of The Young Turks local news academy

The Young Turks' Cenk Uygur. Photo: Seb Daly/Sportsfile via Getty Images

The Young Turks (TYT), one of the largest progressive digital publishers on YouTube, is receiving funding from Google-owned YouTube to launch an online course called TYT Academy that focuses on the creation of digital-first local news. Sources say the investment is in the mid-six-figures range.

Why it matters: The investment is part of YouTube's $25 million commitment to news efforts, which is part of the $300 million Google News Initiative that was announced in 2018.

Marketers own up to their role in data privacy reckoning

Sara Fischer of Axios, Hazel Baker of Reuters Vivian Schiller of the Aspen Institute, John Battelle of Recount Media and Shiv Singh of Eargo at the Interactive Advertising Bureau (IAB) annual leadership meeting in Palm Springs. Photo credit: @baeason

Marketers that for years funneled billions of dollars into platforms using sketchy third-party data, cookies and reckless privacy practices are beginning to come to terms with a new reality.

Driving the news: Speaking at the Interactive Advertising Bureau (IAB) annual leadership meeting in Palm Springs this week, executives confessed that new privacy regulation and industry changes are forcing them to finally be on their best behavior, after years or reckless spending.

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