Media

The big picture

A true digital media publishing breakthrough

Multiple companies turned a profit last year.

Jan 21, 2020 - Economy & Business
Campaigns target younger voters online

Social media makes it easy for campaigns to buy ads targeted to different age groups.

Dec 14, 2019 - Economy & Business
A new entertainment world order

Broadcast networks were shut out of Golden Globe nominations.

Dec 10, 2019 - Economy & Business
The free press is getting squeezed, even in democracies

Charges against Benjamin Netanyahu highlight the trend

Nov 26, 2019 - Economy & Business
A nation of news consumption hypocrites

The topics we say we want covered more aren't the topics we actually read, according to an Axios analysis.

Jun 11, 2019 - Economy & Business
The topics that work best on the different platforms

Politics finds a home on Facebook, Twitter and Reddit.

May 7, 2019 - Economy & Business

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Trump pans "Parasite" during Colorado rally

Photo: Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

Ad-libbing at his rally in Colorado Springs, President Trump attacked "Parasite," which this month became the first non-English-language film to win the Best Picture Oscar, prompting Neon, the studio behind the film, to hit back that "he can't read."

What Trump said: "What the hell was that all about? We've got enough problems with South Korea with trade. On top of that, they give them best movie of the year. Was it good? I don't know. ... Can we get like 'Gone with the Wind' back, please? 'Sunset Boulevard' — so many great movies."

Bloomberg drives record Democratic primary debate ratings

Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images

Mike Bloomberg's first debate appearance drove ratings to a record-high Wednesday night, according to Nielsen ratings provided by NBC News. The debate averaged nearly 20 million live TV viewers across NBC, MSNBC and Telemundo, according to preliminary numbers.

Why it matters: Bloomberg's highly anticipated debate debut drew contentious zingers from opponents who were eager to spar with him on stage for the first time.

CNN hires Andrew Yang as political commentator

Photo: Scott Eisen/Getty Images

Andrew Yang is joining CNN as a political commentator after ending his 2020 presidential campaign last week, the network announced Wednesday.

The big picture: The businessman — who has never held public office — gained national attention in the race through his emphasis on universal basic income, which he believes will alleviate social and economic ills stemming from technological change. He'll make his first CNN appearance to discuss Wednesday's Democratic debate in Nevada "to help shed light on the election and the candidates’ experiences."

Go deeper: Politicians ditch government for cable news

Exclusive: News industry wants to cut Big Tech's safety net

Illustration: Rebecca Zisser/Axios

The News Media Alliance, a trade group which represents thousands of U.S. newspapers, plans to propose limits to a rule that, to-date, has helped Big Tech companies dodge responsibility for the content people upload to their platforms.

The big picture: The 24-year-old provision, Section 230 of the 1996 Communications Decency Act, allows tech companies like Google, Facebook and Twitter to host user-generated content on their platforms without being liable for what it contains.

Record labels rush to IPO amid music streaming boom

Illustration: Caresse Haaser, Rebecca Zisser / Axios

An explosion in people paying for music via streaming services is helping to revive the decades-old record label business, which is now preparing for a slew of public offerings.

Why it matters: "There hasn't been this much optimism in the music business since the invention of the CD," says Ross Gerber, co-founder, president and CEO of Gerber Kawasaki Wealth and Investment Management.

National newspapers thrive while local outlets struggle to survive

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

While big national newspapers grow stronger, local newspaper chains that have for decades kept the vast majority of the country informed are combusting.

Why it matters: The inequity between giants like the New York Times and the Wall Street Journal and their local counterparts represents a growing problem in America as local communities no longer have the power to set the agenda for the news that most affects them.

Jury to deliberate in Weinstein trial without police witnesses

Harvey Weinstein. Photo: Stephanie Keith/Getty Images.

A jury will begin deliberations in Harvey Weinstein's rape trial on Tuesday without testimony from any police witnesses, the Wall Street Journal reports.

Why it matters: Prosecutors called 28 people to testify throughout the trial, including six women who've accused Weinstein of sexual misconduct. But none of the witnesses were law-enforcement officers. Police witnesses add context to cases that could sway how jurors view the case.

Facebook says political candidates can use paid memes

Photo: Chesnot/Getty Images

Facebook said Friday that political candidates, campaigns and groups can use paid branded content across its platforms, a clarification prompted by a move from Michael Bloomberg's campaign to pay top Instagram influencers to post memes on its behalf.

The big picture: Its policy didn't explicitly state that it was OK for candidates to use branded content posts, but after hearing from various campaigns about the issue, Facebook moved to clarify its stance.

Local publishing giant McClatchy files for bankruptcy

The Sacarmento Bee is one of the many local newspapers owned and operated by McClatchy. Photo: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

McClatchy announced Thursday that it voluntarily filed for bankruptcy to allow the company to restructure its debt and pension obligations.

Why it matters: The bankruptcy ends family control of one of the largest newspaper publishers in the country. It will also hand the company to creditors, who "have expressed support for independent journalism," McClatchy DC writes.

Spotify to pay up to $196 million in cash for The Ringer

Bill Simmons. Photo: Mike Windle / Staff/Getty Images

Spotify disclosed in an SEC filing Wednesday that it is paying up to $196 million for The Ringer, a sports media company founded by former ESPN personality Bill Simmons.

Why it matters: It's a solid payout for The Ringer, which was created just four years ago. The Ringer's podcast revenues surpassed $15 million in 2018, and the company says it's profitable.

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