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Trump on October 3, 2019 in Florida. Photo: Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

The top of Sunday's Washington Post Outlook section has two sharp, interesting articles that help explain why Democrats think they have a strong hand on impeachment.

The big picture: For nearly a month, the White House has refused to comply with House investigations into whether Trump jeopardized national security by allegedly pressing Ukraine to interfere in the 2020 presidential election, and by withholding security assistance provided by Congress to help Ukraine.

1) "Secondhand information often has severe legal consequences," writes former public defender Sarah Lustbader:

  • "Law enforcement is expected to use hearsay to lead to more direct sources of information. ... That’s pretty much what happened with the whistleblower complaint: It prompted officials to seek the rough transcript ... And ... the House deposed the former special U.S. envoy to Ukraine, Kurt Volker, who provided incriminating text messages..."
  • Keep reading.

2) "I classified presidential calls. The White House is abusing the system," writes former National Security Council staffer Kelly Magsamen, who served under Presidents George W. Bush and Barack Obama:

  • "I have ... spent hundreds, if not thousands, of hours in the White House Situation Room. It is difficult to overstate just how abnormal and suspicious" the handling of the Ukraine call appears.
  • "The apparent abuse of the classification system offers reason enough for congressional review."
  • "What national security reason was offered for moving the record ... to the code word system? Which NSC lawyers made that decision? Was the national security adviser involved?"
  • Keep reading.

Go deeper: Which House Democrats support impeaching Trump

Go deeper

Ben Geman, author of Generate
22 mins ago - Politics & Policy

The beginning of the beginning for Biden's climate push

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

Joe Biden's inauguration and the days right after will bring a rat-tat-tat burst of climate policy moves, but keep this in mind amid the splashy pledges: pushing through most of his agenda will be a long, uncertain slog.

Why it matters: Biden's climate plan is far more expansive than anything contemplated under President Obama. But for all the immediate pledges, it will take years to see how far Biden gets.

Dion Rabouin, author of Markets
1 hour ago - Economy & Business

Biden's inflation danger

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

President-elect Joe Biden's $1.9 trillion stimulus proposal has economists and bullish market analysts revising their U.S. growth expectations higher, predicting a reflation of the economy in 2021 and possibly more booming returns for risk assets.

Yes, but: Others are warning that what's expected to be reflation could actually show up as inflation, a much less welcome phenomenon.

Ina Fried, author of Login
3 hours ago - Technology

CES was largely irrelevant this year

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Forced online by the pandemic and overshadowed by the attack on the Capitol, the 2021 edition of CES was mostly an afterthought as media's attention focused elsewhere.

Why it matters: The consumer electronics trade show is the cornerstone event for the Consumer Technology Association and Las Vegas has been the traditional early-January gathering place for the tech industry.