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Tom Steyer defended his billionaire status at the 5th Democratic debate Wednesday following months of attacks over using wealth to bankroll his campaign.

THE WASHINGTON POST'S ASHLEY PARKER: "You have spent over $300 million of your own money in support of your political goals. How do you respond to critics who see you as the embodiment of a special interest?"

STEYER: "What I've done over the last decade, is to put together coalitions of ordinary Americans to take on unchecked corporate power... Over the last decade, with the help of the American people, we have taken on and beaten the oil companies. We have taken on and beaten the tobacco companies. We have taken on and beaten utilities."

The big picture: Much of the 2020 Democratic field is rejecting large-dollar donations and focusing on grassroots fundraising. Steyer, who's vowed to use $100 million of his own money in the race, has faced accusations of buying his way to success. He launched his campaign in July.

  • Billionaires are facing increasing backlash from Democrats. Both Steyer and former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg, who is also a billionaire and is expected to make a decision this week on whether he'll enter the Democratic race, have felt some of the heat.

Go deeper:

Go deeper

Updated 23 mins ago - World

Trudeau's party projected to win minority government in Canada

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau. Photo: Jeff Vinnick/Getty Images

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's Liberal government was reelected for a third term in the country's parliamentary elections — but without a majority, CBC and CTV News projected early Tuesday.

By the numbers: The Liberal Party needed to win 170 seats in the 338-seat House of Commons to form a majority government. Preliminary figures showed the party had won 158 seats just after 1:30a.m. ET, with over 91% of polling stations reporting.

48 mins ago - World

Reports: CIA director's team member reported Havana Syndrome symptoms

Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) director Bill Burns during a House Intelligence Committee hearing in April on Capitol Hill. Photo: Al Drago-Pool/Getty Images

A member of CIA director Bill Burns' team who traveled with him to India this month was treated for "symptoms consistent with Havana syndrome," CNN first reported Monday.

Why it matters: Current and former officials told the New York Times the incident signals a "possible escalation" in the mysterious neurological symptoms affecting as many as 200 Americans who've worked in overseas posts since 2016.

Pelosi's back-to-school math problem

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) may need votes from an unlikely source — the Republican Party — if she hopes to pass the bipartisan infrastructure bill by next Monday, as she's promised Democratic centrists.

Why it matters: With at least 20 progressives threatening to vote against the $1.2 trillion bipartisan bill, centrist members are banking on more than 10 Republicans to approve the bill.