Nov 24, 2019

Top Dem: Ethics probe likely on claim Nunes met with Ukrainian official

Rep. Devin Nunes speaks during the impeachment inquiry hearing on Capitol Hill Thursday. Photo: Andrew Harrer-Pool/Getty Images

Rep. Devin Nunes (R-Calif.), a ranking Intelligence Committee member, is "likely" to face an ethics investigation over allegations he discussed former Vice President Joe Biden with an ex-Ukrainian official, House Armed Services Committee Chairman Adam Smith (D-Wash.) told MSNBC Saturday.

Why it matters: CNN alleged in a report late Friday that Nunes met with former Ukrainian prosecutor general Viktor Shokin, who's at the center of the impeachment inquiry into President Trump. Nunes told Breitbart he plans to sue CNN for the "demonstrably false" report.

Driving the news: CNN reported that Nune met with Shokin to discuss Biden and his son Hunter, citing as its source Joseph Bondy, attorney for Lev Parnas, an associate of Rudy Giuliani who's been indicted on campaign finance charges in a separate case.

  • Bondy alleged to CNN and the Washington Post that Parnas "learned from" Shokin that the former prosecutor met with Nunes in Vienna last December. The Daily Beast also claims that Parnas "helped Nunes" in his investigations. Nunes has threatened to sue the Daily Beast for its report.

What they're saying: Nunes told Breitbart late Friday the "scandalous stories published by the Daily Beast and CNN are the perfect example of defamation and reckless disregard for the truth."

"Some political operative offered these fake stories to at least five different media outlets before finding someone irresponsible enough to publish them. I look forward to prosecuting these cases, including the media outlets, as well as the sources of their fake stories, to the fullest extent of the law. I intend to hold the Daily Beast and CNN accountable for their actions. They will find themselves in court soon after Thanksgiving."
— Devin Nunes' remarks to Breitbart
  • MSNBC's Joy Reid asked Smith whether Nunes could be investigated, to which he replied: "Quite likely, without question."

The big picture: If the House Ethics Committee were to open an investigation into Nunes, it would be the second panel probe he's faced in two years.

  • In Dec. 2017, the committee cleared Nunes of allegations that he "may have made unauthorized disclosures of classified information."

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Deaths without consequences

Community organizations and activists demand police accountability at a rally in Grand Central Terminal to commemorate the 5-year anniversary of Mike Brown's death by Ferguson Police Officer Darren Wilson. Photo: Erik McGregor/Getty Images

Seven years after the launch of the Black Lives Matter movement, it's still rare for police officers to be charged in the deaths of African Americans — and even more rare for an officer to go to jail.

The big picture: The Minneapolis police officer who was captured on video kneeling on George Floyd's neck has been charged with third-degree murder and manslaughter — which is already a step beyond the consequences other police officers have faced. But it's no guarantee that he will face jail time.

Teenager killed after shots fired at protesters in Detroit

Detroit police during protests on Friday night. Photo: Matthew Hatcher/Getty Images

A 19-year-old man was killed on Friday night after shots were fired into a crowd of demonstrators in downtown Detroit who were protesting the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis police custody, per AP.

Details: The teenager was injured when shots were fired from an SUV about 11:30 p.m. and later died in hospital, reports MDN reports, which noted police were still looking for a suspect. Police said officers were not involved in the shooting, according to AP.

Go deeper: In photos: Protesters clash with police nationwide over George Floyd

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In photos: Protesters clash with police nationwide over George Floyd

Police officers grapple with protesters in Atlanta. Photo: Elijah Nouvelage/Getty Images

Police used tear gas, rubber bullets and pepper spray as the protests sparked by the killing of George Floyd spread nationwide on Friday evening.

The big picture: Police responded in force in cities ranging from Atlanta to Des Moines, Houston to Detroit, Milwaukee to D.C. and Denver to Louisville. In Los Angeles, police declared a stretch of downtown off limits, with Oakland issuing a similar warning.