Sign up for our daily briefing

Make your busy days simpler with Axios AM/PM. Catch up on what's new and why it matters in just 5 minutes.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Denver news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Denver

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Des Moines news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Des Moines

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Minneapolis-St. Paul news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Twin Cities

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Tampa Bay news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Tampa Bay

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Charlotte news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Charlotte

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

The Westerdam cruise ship docked in Sihanoukville, Cambodia on Friday. Photo: Paula Bronstein/Getty Images

Hundreds of passengers and crew members aboard the Westerdam cruise ship are undergoing tests for the novel coronavirus at Cambodia after an American traveler tested positive for the virus, the ship's operator confirmed in a statement Tuesday.

The latest: 92 American citizens remain on board the Westerdam, operated by Holland America Line, and another 260 are awaiting travel clearance in hotels in Cambodia's capital, Phnom Penh, said Dr. William Walters, director of operational medicine at the State Department, during a news briefing Monday.

  • Cambodian Health Ministry officials are on board the Westerdam, docked off the port of Sihanoukville, testing for COVID-19 on the 255 guests and 747 crew awaiting clearance, Holland America said. The tests are expected to take several days to complete.

U.S. case: The 83-year-old American woman tested positive last Friday in Kuala Lumpur after the ship arrived from Cambodia, per the Malaysian health ministry. Her 85-year-old husband has tested negative for COVID-19, Holland America said.

  • "The guest was taken to the hospital and is reported to be in stable condition," the statement said.

The big picture: The Westerdam was carrying 2,257 passengers and crew when it docked in Malaysia after several ports denied it entry over coronavirus fears, per the cruise liner. President Trump thanked Cambodia for accepting the ship Friday.

  • Several countries were trying on Monday to locate hundreds of passengers who departed the Westerdam cruise ship when it docked in Malaysia, where an American traveler tested positive for the novel coronavirus, per the New York Times.
  • Malaysian officials have now barred all cruise ships from its ports and the remaining Westerdam passengers are not welcome in the country, the Malay Mail first reported.

What they're saying: Health experts have expressed concern that Westerdam passengers were released without a quarantine order, including the woman infected with COVID-19.

  • Stanley Deresinski, a Stanford University professor and infectious disease specialist at the university hospital, told Fortune magazine, "This woman was on the boat and was infected for a few days — she could have potentially exposed other people on the boat who have now gone home. ... It doesn't require prolonged exposure to be infected."
  • Jeff Duchin, health officer and chief of communicable disease epidemiology section at Seattle and King County health department, told the Washington Post, "[T]here is transmission occurring in unexpected places that we're not aware of. ... The virus is moving very quickly and silently and presents a real challenge to containment."
  • All aboard the Westerdam underwent health screenings on Feb. 10 and further checks after disembarking in Cambodia, Holland America said. The woman displayed no symptoms for the virus during the voyage.

Go deeper:

Editor's note: This article has been updated with more details, including comment from Walters and Holland America.

Go deeper

The rebellion against Silicon Valley (the place)

Photo illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios. Smith Collection/Gado via Getty Images

Silicon Valley may be a "state of mind," but it's also very much a real enclave in Northern California. Now, a growing faction of the tech industry is boycotting it.

Why it matters: The Bay Area is facing for the first time the prospect of losing its crown as the top destination for tech workers and startups — which could have an economic impact on the region and force it to reckon with its local issues.

Erica Pandey, author of @Work
1 hour ago - Economy & Business

Telework's tax mess

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

As teleworkers flit from city to city, they're creating a huge tax mess.

Why it matters: Our tax laws aren't built for telecommuting, and this new way of working could have dire implications for city and state budgets.

Wanted: New media bosses, everywhere

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The Washington Post, Los Angeles Times, Reuters, HuffPost and Wired are all looking for new editors. Soon, The New York Times will be too.

Why it matters: The new hires will reflect a new generation — one that's addicted to technology, demands accountability and expects diversity to be a priority.