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People shop for groceries in San Francisco on Nov. 2. Photo: Liu Guanguan/China News Service via Getty Images

Americans are again stockpiling cleaning supplies and toilet paper as the U.S. experiences another surge of coronavirus, according to AP.

Why it matters: More than half of the counties across the country — 58% of them — have seen the peak of their coronavirus infections this month, and 76% of counties have peaked at some point so far this fall, causing people to stockpile supplies like they did at the start of the pandemic.

The big picture: Walmart U.S. CEO John Furner said Tuesday that supply chains can't meet the rising demand, especially in locations in communities experiencing sizable spikes in new cases, CNN reports.

  • Supermarket chains including Kroger, Publix and H-E-B are now limiting in-store and online purchases of toilet paper and other paper goods along with cleaning supplies to reduce the strain on supply chains, according to NBC News.

What they're saying: Geoff Freeman, president and CEO of the Consumer Brands Association, told AP he expect stores to be better prepared for the uptick.

  • “A more informed consumer combined with a more informed manufacturer and a more informed retailer should provide all of us with a greater sense of ease and ensure we can meet this growing demand, “ Freeman said.

Go deeper

COVID cases are peaking now in most of the country

Expand chart
Data: CSSE Johns Hopkins University; Map: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

While some parts of the country endured high rates of coronavirus infection in the spring and summer, most of the country is experiencing the worst of it right now.

By the numbers: Most American counties — 58% of them — have seen the peak of their coronavirus infections this month, and 76% of counties have peaked at some point in the fall.

Updated 15 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Sen. Kelly Loeffler to return to campaign trail after 2nd negative test

Sen. Kelly Loeffler addresses supporters during a rally on Thursday. Photo: Jessica McGowan/Getty Images

Sen. Kelly Loeffler's (R-Ga.) campaign announced Monday that she "looks forward to getting back out on the campaign trail" after testing negative for COVID-19 for a second time, following earlier conflicting results.

Why it matters: Loeffler has been campaigning at events ahead of a Jan. 5 runoff in elections that'll decide which party holds the Senate majority. Vice President Mike Pence was with her on Friday.

Updated 4 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Key government agency says Biden transition can formally begin

General Services Administrator Emily Murphy. Photo: Alex Edelman/CNP/Getty Images

General Services Administrator Emily Murphy said in a letter to President-elect Joe Biden on Monday that she has determined the transition from the Trump administration can formally begin.

Why it matters: Murphy, a Trump appointee, had come under fire for delaying the so-called "ascertainment" and withholding the funds and information needed for the transition to begin while Trump's legal challenges played out.