Photo: Rita Maas/Getty Images

Online ramen noodle sales have skyrocketed 578% between Feb. 23 and March 21, as American consumers continue to stash reserves of non-perishables during the coronavirus pandemic, according to a company presentation cited by Bloomberg.

The big picture: Sales of shelf-stable products, including pastas and canned soups, have swelled more than 400% in recent weeks. However, consumers' spending habits throughout the outbreak have recently shifted to office supplies, toys and exercise equipment — a period Walmart has dubbed "Restricted Living," Bloomberg writes.

Zoom in: Walmart has experienced a 17% increase in sales in recent weeks, compared to the same time last year.

The pressure of keeping up with demand has also pushed Walmart to limit the number of customers in-stores starting Saturday. The retail giant's online traffic could surge even more as it imposes customer limits in its stores.

The impact: This provides a look into how Americans are handling the stress of being stuck at home as the World Health Organization urges countries to maintain strong restrictions. Americans' stockpiling of goods has resulted in supply chain bottlenecks as manufacturers try to increase production.

Go deeper: Fixing America's broken coronavirus supply chain

Go deeper

10 mins ago - Health

The pandemic hasn't hampered the health care industry

Illustration: Rebecca Zisser/Axios

The economy has been tanking. Coronavirus infections and deaths have been rising. And the health care industry is as rich as ever.

The big picture: Second-quarter results are still pouring in, but so far, a vast majority of health care companies are reporting profits that many people assumed would not have been possible as the pandemic raged on.

Column / Harder Line

How climate and business woes are sinking a natural-gas project

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

The Trump administration recently touted its approval of America’s first terminal on the West Coast to export liquefied natural gas. There’s just one problem: it probably won’t be built.

Why it matters: The project in southern Oregon faces political and business hurdles serious enough that those who are following it say it will be shelved. Its problems embody the struggles facing a once-promising sector that's now struggling under the weight of the pandemic and more.

Updated 44 mins ago - Science

Isaias strengthens as it crawls toward the Carolinas

A wave crashes ashore as Tropical Storm Isaias passes through Jetty Park in Fort Pierce, Florida, on Sunday. Photo: Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Tropical Storm Isaias is expected to reach the Carolinas late Monday at "near hurricane strength," the National Hurricane Center (NHC) said.

The latest: Isaias was 65 miles northeast of Cape Canaveral with winds increasing to 70 mph, the NHC said in a 2 a.m. update. Storm surge warnings and hurricane watches were in effect for North and South Carolina and Rhode Island. Tropical storm watches were in effect for Florida, Long Island and Delaware.