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Secretary of Defense Mark Esper. Photo: Greg Nash/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

The Pentagon effectively banned the display of the Confederate flag on military installations, per a memo signed Thursday by Defense Secretary Mark Esper.

Why it matters: The move was done in a way meant to largely avoid President Trump's ire by not explicitly banning it. The memo instead listed flags that are allowed to be displayed on military property, leaving out the Confederate flag.

  • On Tuesday, Trump told CBS News that flying the Confederate flag was a "freedom of speech" issue.
  • Trump also said last month that he will "not even consider" renaming the 10 U.S. military bases that are named after Confederate leaders.

What they're saying: "We must always remain focused on what unifies us, our sworn oath to the Constitution and our shared duty to defend the nation," Esper’s memo read.

  • "The flags we fly must accord with the military imperatives of good order and discipline, treating all our people with dignity and respect, and rejecting divisive symbols."

Flashback: The Navy and Marines both issued policies last month to ban Confederate symbols on their properties.

Go deeper: Confederate monuments become flashpoints in protests against racism

Go deeper

Far-right groups clash with anti-racism protesters in U.S. cities

The Proud Boys, a far-right group, faces off against Black Lives Matters protesters using mace and a paint ball gun in Portland, Oregon, on Saturday. Photo: Paula Bronstein/Getty Images

Far-right demonstrators clashed with anti-racism protesters in several U.S. cities on Saturday, per USA Today.

Driving the news: In Portland, counter-protesters at a pro-police rally were "aiming pepper spray and firing some kind of pellet gun at people" as Black Lives Matter demonstrators marked an 80th straight day of protests, the Oregonian reports.

Biden will reverse Trump's attempt to lift COVID-related travel restrictions

Photo: Tasos Katopodis via Getty

The incoming Biden administration will reverse President Trump's last-minute order to lift COVID-19 related travel restrictions, Jen Psaki, the incoming White House press secretary, tweeted.

Why it matters: President Trump ordered entry bans lifted for travelers from the U.K., Ireland, Brazil and much of Europe to go into effect Jan. 26, but the Biden administration will "strengthen public health measures around international travel in order to further mitigate the spread of COVID-19," Jen Psaki said. Biden will be inaugurated on Wednesday, Jan. 20 and Trump will no longer be president by the time the order is set to go into effect.

Dominion sends cease and desist letter to My Pillow CEO Mike Lindell

Photo: Stephen Maturen/Getty Images

Dominion Voting Systems on Monday sent a cease and desist letter to My Pillow CEO Mike Lindell over his spread of misinformation related to the 2020 election.

Why it matters: Trump and several of his allies have pushed false conspiracy theories about the company, leading Dominion to take legal action. It's suing pro-Trump lawyer Sidney Powell for defamation and $1.3 billion in damages, and a Dominion employee has sued Trump himself, OANN and Newsmax.