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Carter Page at CPAC in February 2020. Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

Former Trump campaign foreign policy adviser Carter Page filed a $75 million lawsuit against the FBI, Justice Department and former FBI Director James Comey, claiming he was the victim of “unlawful spying" during the bureau's Russia investigation.

Why it matters: The lawsuit largely echoes a DOJ inspector general report that found errors in applications to acquire wiretap warrants on Page through the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act, or FISA, according to AP.

Context: Inspector General Michael Horowitz, who investigated the origins of the 2016 Russia investigations, said in a 2019 Senate Judiciary Committee hearing that he found no evidence of political bias in the FBI's scrutiny of Trump administration officials, including Page.

  • Horowitz also determined that the FBI was justified in opening its probe after receiving a tip on Trump campaign adviser George Papadopoulos.
  • However, the inspector general also counted at least 17 errors in Page's FISA application, including the omission of information that may have refuted allegations he was a Russian agent.

The big picture: The lawsuit, filed Friday, accuses the FBI of relying excessively on information complied by Christopher Steele, a former British spy, and that the bureau failed to tell the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court that Steele’s primary source contradicted information that Steele attributed to him.

  • The suit also claims the FBI misled the court about his relationship with the CIA.
  • Kevin Clinesmith, an ex-FBI lawyer, pleaded guilty in August to altering an email, saying Page had not been a source for the CIA when he was. The email was used in an application to renew a wiretap on Page.

Go deeper

Trump supporter found with pipe bombs accused of plot to attack Democrats

Five improvised explosive devices that the FBI says "were fully operational and could cause great bodily harm or injury if handled improperly." Photo: FBI/Justice Department

The FBI believes California Gov. Gavin Newsom (D) and the Bay Area headquarters of Twitter and Facebook were targets of a man facing federal explosives charges, according to a criminal complaint.

Driving the news: Prosecutors charged Ian Benjamin Rogers after finding weapons including five pipe bombs, 49 guns and thousands of rounds of ammunition following a Jan. 15 search of his Napa County home and auto repair business. His alleged goal was to ensure former President Trump remained in office.

Updated 4 hours ago - World

Skripal poisoning suspects linked to Czech blast, as country expels 18 Russians

Combined images released by British police in 2018 of Alexander Petrov (L) and Ruslan Boshirov, who are suspected of carrying out an attack in the in the southern English city of Salisbury using Novichok, a military-grade nerve agent, and also the2014 Czech depot explosion. Photo: Metropolitan Police via Getty Images

Czech police on Saturday connected two Russian men suspected of carrying out a poisoning attack in Salisbury, England, with a deadly ammunition depot explosion southeast of the capital, Prague, per Reuters.

Driving the news: Czech officials announced Saturday they're expelling 18 Russian diplomats they accuse of being involved in the blast in Vrbětice, AP notes. Czech police said later they're searching for two men carrying several passports — including two with the names Alexander Petrov and Ruslan Boshirov.

Indianapolis mass shooting suspect legally bought 2 guns, police say

Marion County Forensic Services vehicles are parked at the site of a mass shooting at a FedEx facility in Indianapolis, Indiana, on Friday. Photo: Jeff Dean/AFP via Getty Images

The suspected gunman in this week's mass shooting at a FedEx facility in Indianapolis legally purchased two "assault rifles" believed to have been used in the attack, police said late Saturday.

Of note: The Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Department's statement that Brandon Scott Hole, 19, bought the rifles last July and September comes a day after the FBI told news outlets that a "shotgun was seized" from the suspect in March 2020 after his mother raised concerns about his mental health.