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A screen from Mayor Muriel Bowser's PowerPoint presentation today. Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Last week's siege is turning the nation's capital into Fortress Washington.

Why it matters: In the aftermath of Capitol assault, security has been heightened throughout D.C., prompting the question: Will the loss of freedoms be temporary or permanent? It's also sparked rage that prior defenses proved so porous.

National Park Service authorities announced Monday they have closed the Washington Monument through Joe Biden's inauguration.

  • The Washington Post reported up to 15,000 National Guard troops could be sent to the city to ensure security for the event.
  • Mayor Muriel Bowser asked President Trump to issue a emergency declaration to release extra security funding. He later agreed. She also asked tourists to stay away from the city.
  • Groups of U.S. Park Police officers are already patrolling the Lincoln Memorial. Barriers are spread at the foot of the steps where Martin Luther King Jr. once spoke, with a gap for pedestrians that can be closed at a moment's notice.
  • Security fencing now surrounds the Capitol, and National Guard troops are stationed on the perimeter. The fence will remain for 30 days.
  • Crews have reinstalled plywood on offices and storefronts throughout downtown after removing it following Election Day.

The backstory: After the 1995 Oklahoma City bombing, vehicle traffic was permanently blocked from Pennsylvania Avenue in front of the White House.

  • Following the 9/11 attacks, thousands of bollards were drilled into the ground around all federal buildings to halt truck bombs.
  • Rifle-toting police and dog teams also stretched along the perimeter of the Capitol, no longer letting pedestrians enjoy sunsets from its western face.
  • Congress also spent over $600 million on the Capitol Visitors Center, pushing security checkpoints farther away from the building.
  • Throughout the Trump administration, unscalable fencing has been repeatedly installed, expanded and removed from sidewalks and parks surrounding the White House, enlarging the no-tourist zone.

What they're saying: "I hate all these fences going up," Rep. Tom Malinowski (D-N.J.) told CNN this afternoon, saying he hopes they can come down soon.

  • Malinowski urged authorities to pursue extremists and domestic terrorists in their hometowns.
  • "We need to go on offense," he said.

Go deeper

In photos: D.C. and U.S. states on alert for pre-inauguration violence

National Guard troops stand behind security fencing with the dome of the U.S. Capitol Building behind them, on Jan. 16. Photo: Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

Security has been stepped up in Washington, D.C., and state capitols across the U.S. as authorities brace for potential violence this weekend.

Driving the news: Following the Jan. 6 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol by some supporters of President Trump, the FBI has said there could be armed protests in D.C. and in all 50 state capitols in the run-up to President-elect Joe Biden's inauguration Wednesday.

Resurrecting Martin Luther King's office

King points to Selma, Alabama on a map at his Southern Christian Leadership Conference office in Atlanta in January 1965. Photo: Bettmann/Getty Contributor

Efforts to save the office where Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., planned some of the most important moments of the civil rights movement are hitting roadblocks amid a political stalemate.

Why it matters: The U.S. Park Service needs to OK agreements so a developer restoring the historic Prince Hall Masonic Lodge in Atlanta — which once housed King's Southern Christian Leadership Conference — can tap into private funding and begin work.

Updated 5 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

  1. Health: Most vulnerable Americans aren't getting enough vaccine information — Fauci says Trump administration's lack of facts on COVID "very likely" cost lives.
  2. Politics: Biden unveils "wartime" COVID strategyBiden's COVID-19 bubble.
  3. Vaccine: Florida requiring proof of residency to get vaccine — CDC extends interval between vaccine doses for exceptional cases.
  4. World: Hong Kong to put tens of thousands on lockdown as cases surge.
  5. Sports: 2021 Tokyo Olympics hang in the balance.
  6. 🎧 Podcast: Carbon Health's CEO on unsticking the vaccine bottleneck.