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Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Over the last year, jobs that we never considered dangerous have turned into hazardous occupations.

Why it matters: Millions of Americans are finding themselves on the front lines of crises that they didn't see coming — and they're often not trained, or paid enough, to be there.

First, it was the pandemic that put grocery workers, servers and bartenders in harm's way as they continued working in person while a deadly virus ravaged our cities and towns.

Now, in a frayed political climate, more occupations have turned into front-line jobs.

  • "Pilots and flight attendants are trained to keep passengers safe in the air and, since 9/11, to be on the lookout for potential terrorists. But in these extraordinary times, their duties have expanded to include mask enforcement and now, apparently, quelling civil unrest," Axios' Joann Muller writes.
  • Journalists who cover wars have long undergone safety trainings, but last week, congressional and White House reporters found themselves in the middle of an insurrection. The accounts by my colleagues Alayna Treene and Kadia Goba of what it was like inside the room as a pro-Trump mob stormed the U.S. Capitol is worthy of your time.

The bottom line: The pandemic, along with the recent political unrest, has upended workplace safety — but laws and worker protections have not yet caught up to our reality.

Go deeper

House GOP leader says Trump “bears responsibility,” but won’t vote to impeach

House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.), while making his case against impeaching President Trump for a second time on Wednesday, noted that Trump "bears responsibility" for a mob of his supporters breaching the U.S. Capitol last week.

Why it matters: The core accusation of House Democrats in their article of impeachment against Trump is that he incited insurrection against the U.S. government by urging his supporters to breach the U.S. Capitol.

Amy Harder, author of Generate
10 mins ago - Energy & Environment
Column / Harder Line

Biden ushers in historical turn on clean energy and climate change

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Like the curve of Earth we can’t see from the ground, we’re on a curve in history that we won’t fully recognize until decades in the future.

Driving the news: The inauguration of President Biden completes an economic and political consensus that climate change is an urgent threat the world should aggressively address. Whether this consensus produces action remains deeply uncertain.

Updated 8 hours ago - World

Mexican President López Obrador tests positive for coronavirus

Mexico's President Andrés Manuel López Obrador during a press conference at National Palace in Mexico City, Mexico, on Wednesday. Photo: Ismael Rosas/Eyepix Group/Barcroft Media via Getty Images

Mexican President Andrés Manuel López Obrador announced Sunday evening that he's tested positive for COVID-19.

Driving the news: López Obrador tweeted that he has mild symptoms and is receiving medical treatment. "As always, I am optimistic," he added. "We will all move forward."

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