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A demonstrator holds up a sign of Breonna Taylor during a protest in Louisville, Kentucky. Photo: Brandon Bell/Getty Images

Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer declared a state of emergency Tuesday "due to the potential for civil unrest" ahead of Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron's expected announcement on the Breonna Taylor case.

Of note: Louisville has witnessed more than 115 days of protests over the police killing of Taylor, an unarmed Black woman, with calls for all the officers involved to be charged.

"Our goal is ensuring space and opportunity for potential protesters to gather and express their First Amendment rights after the announcement. At the same time, we are preparing for any eventuality to keep everyone safe. ... we do not know when the announcement will come, but we must prepare for it."
Statement by Fischer

What's happening: Cameron is expected to announce a decision on charges as early as this week. The Louisville police chief declared a state of emergency for the department on Monday.

  • "The public may also see barriers being staged around downtown, which is another part of our preparations," Louisville Metro Police Department (LMPD) spokesperson Lamont Washington said in a statement to the Courier Journal announcing that department was cancelling all pending vacation request and days off. "It is important to note that the AG has said there is no timetable for the announcement." 
  • Two federal buildings, including the federal courthouse, in downtown Louisville have also been closed and boarded up in preparation of an announcement, local media reported.

The big picture: Taylor was shot dead by police on March 13 when LMPD officers conducting a narcotics investigation barged into the 26-year-old's home in plain-clothes to serve a "no-knock" warrant.

  • Police exchanged fire with Taylor's boyfriend, who said he fired believing the home was being broken into.
  • Protests over Taylor's death erupted in Louisville in May following the police killing of George Floyd in Minnesota.
  • The Louisville Metro Council has since banned no-knock warrants.
  • Last week, Louisville announced a $12 million settlement package with Taylor's family. The settlement also includes a series of police reforms. Taylor's family has continued to call for the officers involved in her death to be charged.

Go deeper: What you need to know about the Breonna Taylor shooting

Editor's note: This article has been updated with Fischer's announcement on the state of emergency.

Go deeper

Girlfriend told police Nashville man was building bombs year before explosion

Law enforcement officers investigate the house of Anthony Warner. Photo: Terry Wyatt/Getty Images

The girlfriend of Anthony Warner, the man who is believed to have detonated the bomb in Nashville on Christmas Day, warned police officers in August 2019 that he "was building bombs in the RV trailer at his residence," according to police reports obtained by The Tennessean.

Why it matters: Although the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation said Warner "was not on our radar" before the explosion, the report from the Metro Nashville Police Department "shows that local and federal authorities were aware of alleged threats he had made," The Tennessean writes.

DOJ declines to charge officers in 2014 fatal shooting of Tamir Rice

People gather to protest against the police killing of Tamir Rice. Photo: Andy Katz/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images

The Department of Justice said on Tuesday it would not bring charges against two officers in 2014 fatal shooting of 12-year-old Tamir Rice, and that it was closing its federal investigation into the shooting.

Why it matters: The killing of Rice triggered large protests against police brutality and galvanized support for the Black Lives Matter movement. Reacting to Tuesday's announcement, Rice's family lawyer said the Justice Department’s “process was tainted," per AP.

2 hours ago - World

UN Security Council meeting on Israel-Gaza as fighting enters 7th day

Smoke billows from a fire following Israeli airstrikes on multiple targets in Gaza on May 16. Photo: Mohammed Abed/AFP via Getty Images

The United Nations Security Council was preparing to meet Sunday, as the aerial bombardment between Israel and Hamas between entered a seventh day.

The latest: Four Palestinians died in airstrikes early Sunday, as Israeli forces bombed the home of Gaza's Hamas chief, Yehya al-Sinwar, per Reuters.