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Photo: Mario Tama/Getty Images

Louisville, Kentucky's Metro Council unanimously voted on Thursday to ban "no-knock" search warrants in the city, the Courier-Journal reports.

Why it matters: That warrant allows law enforcement to enter homes without warning, and was reportedly obtained by the officers who shot Louisville resident Breonna Taylor in her home on March 13. Her death has been protested by Black Lives Matter demonstrators following the police killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis.

  • Police who entered Taylor's home were reportedly investigating two men believed to be selling drugs out of a house more than 10 miles from her home, according to the Louisville Courier Journal.
  • No narcotics were found in her apartment.
  • Officers used a battering ram to break down Taylor's door and shot her at least eight times after her boyfriend fired his gun at an officer in self-defense.

The state of play: The new ordinance, named "Breonna's Law," allows Louisville police to only use no-knock warrants if there is an "imminent threat of harm or death," such as in cases of murder, hostage-taking, kidnapping, terrorism, human trafficking or sexual trafficking, per the Courier.

What they're saying: “Metro Council’s passage of Breonna’s Law is a small bit of justice for Breonna’s mourning family and our angry, heartbroken city," the executive director of the Kentucky ACLU said in a statement. "It’s an important, but small step in the fight to eradicate racist police violence that has taken too many lives."

Go deeper: National Guard heads to Louisville, Ky., to quell protests over fatal March police shooting

Go deeper

Harris rebukes Barr: "We do have two systems of justice in America"

Sen. Kamala Harris (D-Calif.) pushed back on Attorney General Bill Barr's assertion on CNN that there are not two systems of justice in America, arguing that he and President Trump "are spending full time in a different reality."

Why it matters: The question of whether there is "systemic racism" in policing and criminal justice is a clear, dividing line between Democrats and the Trump administration.

Schumer: Trump impeachment trial to start week of Feb. 8

Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer. Photo: The Washington Post via Getty

The Senate will begin former President Trump's impeachment trial the week of Feb. 8, Majority Leader Chuck Schumer announced Friday on the Senate floor.

Why it matters: Trump is the only president in U.S. history to be impeached twice. The House voted to impeach the former president on Jan. 13 on a single charge: incitement of insurrection for the Jan. 6 breach of the U.S. Capitol, which resulted in five deaths.

1 hour ago - Health

CDC extends interval between COVID vaccine doses for exceptional cases

Photo: Joseph Prezioso/AFP via Getty

Patients can space out the two doses of the coronavirus vaccine by up to six weeks if it’s "not feasible" to follow the shorter recommended window, according to updated guidance from the Centers for Disease and Control and Prevention.

Driving the news: With the prospect of vaccine shortages and a low likelihood that supply will expand before April, the latest changes could provide a path to vaccinate more Americans — a top priority for President Biden.