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The Louisville Metro government on Tuesday announced a $12 million settlement package with the family of Breonna Taylor, a 26-year-old Black woman who was shot in her own home by police officers in March. The settlement also includes a series of police reforms.

The big picture: The settlement is the largest ever paid by the city's police, per the Louisville Courier Journal. It will close out the wrongful death lawsuit filed in April by Taylor's mother, Tamika Palmer. Other legal proceedings related to Taylor's death have not yet concluded.

The settlement contains reforms on the approval process for and execution of search warrants, the hiring of social workers at LMPD, and a commitment to increase drug and alcohol testing of officers involved in any shooting, Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer announced Tuesday.

  • Other changes include encouraging officers to perform at least two paid hours a week of community service in the communities they serve and housing credits for officers to live in certain low-income parts of the city.

Background: Police entered Taylor's home while investigating men they believed to be selling drugs out of a house 10 miles away. They shot her at least eight times after her boyfriend, who was awakened by the incident, fired his gun in self-defense.

  • Taylor's death sparked protests across Louisville and the country, as well as widespread calls on social media for the arrests of the officers involved in the shooting. It has become a focal point of the Black Lives Matter movement.

What's next: Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron is still investigating the incident, along with the FBI, which opened a probe in May.

  • A grand jury enlisted in Jefferson County will hear the criminal case, per the Courier Journal, and decide whether to charge the officers involved in the shooting.

Go deeper: What you need to know about the Breonna Taylor shooting

Editor's note: This story has been corrected to reflect that Taylor was not sleeping when she was shot by police.

Go deeper

Updated Nov 28, 2020 - World

London police arrest 155 during anti-lockdown protests

Police officers stop a protester as anti-lockdown demonstrators march in central London. Photo: Tayfun Salci/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

London police arrested at least 155 people during protests against coronavirus lockdown measures Saturday, the Metropolitan Police said.

Driving the news: Protesters, including many who were not wearing masks, marched through parts of London, chanting "freedom" and holding signs that read: "no more lockdowns," per Sky News. The country has been under a national lockdown since Nov. 5.

Using apps to prevent deadly police encounters

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Mobile phone apps are evolving in ways that can stop rather than simply document deadly police encounters with people of color — including notifying family and lawyers about potential violations in real time.

Why it matters: As states and cities face pressure to reform excessive force policies, apps that monitor police are becoming more interactive, gathering evidence against rogue officers as well as posting social media videos to shame the agencies.

Dan Primack, author of Pro Rata
15 hours ago - Technology

TikTok gets more time (again)

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

The White House is again giving TikTok's Chinese parent company more to satisfy national security concerns, rather than initiating legal action, a source familiar with the situation tells Axios.

The state of play: China's ByteDance had until Friday to resolve issues raised by the Committee on Foreign Investment in the U.S. (CFIUS), which is chaired by Treasury secretary Steve Mnuchin. This was the company's third deadline, with CFIUS having provided two earlier extensions.